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I have a Model class, which contains Lists of Messages and Signals.

Every Message can contain 0, 1 or more Signals. A Signal can be contained by 0, 1 or more Messages at the same time. I'm having trouble maintaining the relationship between Messages and Signals when deserializing with the XmlSerializer, while also avoiding duplicate objects (in my application it is not possible to use anything other than the XmlSerializer).

class Model
{
    private MessageCollection messages;
    public MessageCollection Messages { get { return messages; } }

    private SignalCollection signals;
    public SignalCollection Signals { get { return signals; } }

    public Model()
    {
        // the collection classes automatically set the Model property of any
        // Messages/Signals added to its appropriate owner (this)
        this.messages = new MessageCollection(this);
        this.signals = new SignalCollection(this);
    }
}

class Message
{
    [XmlIgnore] // set by MessageCollection
    public Model Model { get; set; }

    public List<Signal> Signals
    {
        get { ??? }
    }
}

class Signal
{
    [XmlIgnore] // set by SignalCollection
    public Model Model { get; set; }

    public List<Message> Messages
    {
        get { return this.Model.Messages.Where(x => x.Signals.Contains(this)).ToList(); }
    }
}

I had the idea to store a List<uint> SignalIndices in the Message class, which contains the indices of the Signals as they are in the Model.Signals list. However, is it safe to assume the XmlSerializer will not mess up the indices when serializing/deserializing? Also, this approach would imply that Message.Signals gets the [XmlIgnore] attribute and relies on another Linq using the SignalIndices list in order to achieve a similar thing as in Signal.Messages.

In other words, is it possible through a similar technique as used with the MessageCollection and SignalCollection classes to ensure data consistency at all times ( also during the deserialization process, in which the order of object construction is undefined), while also having a "real" list of signals (List<Signal>) in the Message class that does not use Linq?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you add a unique id to both Message and Signal, then you could add a new MessageSignals singleton class which serializes to a Key Value pair of Message id and Signal id. Then you can serialize and deserialize all Messages, all Signals and all MessageSignal pairings. You would then use the MessageSignal class as a lookup for getting all the Signals for a Message

  public IEnumerable<Signal> Signals
  {
    get
    {
      return from signal in Signals
      from ms in MessageSignals
      where ms.MessageId == this.MessageId && ms.SignalId==signal.Id
      select signal;
    }
  }

It's very analogous to how many-to-many relationships are handled in most databases.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure why I didn't have this idea since I've done exactly that in databases as well. I managed to do it without an extra singleton class though, by adding the ID only to the Signals and having a List of SignalIDs in Message. The Singleton approach is essentially just my version, but cross-joined with all messages. I refrained from doing this at first because both Message.Signals and Signal.Messages are Linqed, but I was once again positively surprised with the performance of Linq. I would've preferred to have the results 'cached' in an actual List upon deserialization though... – dialer Jul 4 '12 at 14:01
    
Probably a better approach. Serializing and deserializing singletons is always a bit of a nightmare. – Mark Green Jul 4 '12 at 14:43

If the reference to model inside the signalcollection is purely for setting the model property, you could use a signalcollection class inside the message itself

class Message
{
    [XmlIgnore] // set by MessageCollection
    public Model Model { get{return signals==null ? null : signals.Model;} set{signals=new SignalCollection(value);} }

    SignalCollection signals;
    public SignalCollection Signals
    {
        get { return signals; }
    }
}

Or have a new signal class derive from List that exposes a model property.

If the above is not an option you could add a method to Model that fires after deserialization (by using the OnDeserializedAttribute )

class Model
{
     [OnDeserialized]
     private void restoreModelSignals(StreamingContext context)
    {
        //bit of linq here though
        foreach(var s in messages.SelectMany(m=>m.Signals))
             s.Model=this;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The first option wouldn't work because the moment the Message is being deserialized, signals cannot be constructed because the model, which needs to be passed to a SignalCollection upon consruction, is unknown. Having this property serialized and deserialized would result in duplicate Signal and Model objects. Using the OnserializedAttribute together with Mark Green's answer could be a very good solution though. – dialer Jul 4 '12 at 11:33
    
Okay, now I'm sad because XmlSerializer doesn't support serialization callbacks like methods with the OnDeserializedAttribute. – dialer Jul 4 '12 at 12:47

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