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Given a WCF duplex service (NetTcpBinding) that is configured to create a new service instance for each new client (see pattern publish-subscribe), you can get a specific instance of callback for each service instance. Since different instances are created, methods belonging to different callbacks can be invoked from different threads concurrently.

  • What happens if multiple threads try to invoke the same method on the same callback?
  • What happens if they try to invoke different methods but for the same callback?
  • Should we manage concurrent access to these methods from multiple threads? In both cases?

Consider now the client side that communicates with the service: to make sure that the client can use the service, you must instantiate a new proxy, and in order to invoke the methods defined in the service, you must invoke the corresponding methods of the proxy.

  • What happens if multiple threads try to invoke the same method on the same proxy instance?
  • What happens if they try to invoke different methods but for the same proxy instance?
  • Should we manage concurrent access to these methods from multiple threads? In both cases?
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Not really a question is it. More like a whole area to learn . You should just write a load of tests to really explore things. Lets face it no answer will stop you having to do that anyway. –  John Nicholas Jul 4 '12 at 11:57

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The answers to most of those questions depend on how you manage your service's concurrency. There is no definitive answer since it depends on what you set for your ConcurrencyMode and InstanceContextMode. WCF's concurrency management will enable you to fine tune your service's threading behavior and performance. A long and arduous (but very detailed) read on concurrency management is available on MSDN.

The InstanceContextMode allows you to define how your service should be instantiated. For a service performing a lot of heavy duty work and handling lots of calls, the general idea is to use PerCall instancing as with this setting incoming client requests will be processed on a seperate instance of the service each time.

ConcurrencyMode, the main player, will alow you to define how many threads can access a service instance at a given time. In ConcurrencyMode=Single, only one thread can access the service instance at a time. This also depends on whether you've enabled the SynchronizationConext, if SynchronizationConext=true then the client calls will be queued if your service is in the process of answering another request. So incoming service calls will be queued up until the preceding calls are dealt with first. With the ConcurrencyMode=Multiple setting, any number of threads are allowed access to a service instance, meaning your service can answer as many calls as possible given how many threads (directly related to CPU power) are available to it in the Thread pool. The catch with multiple concurrency mode is that your service many not be so reliable in the order in which it receives and responds to calls, since state will not be managed as the SynchronizationContext will be set to false by default. A nice and short summary on concurrency modes and thread safety is available on MSDN.

These settings will affect your service performance when used in conjunction with the InstanceContext mode, see this pretty nice article which explores various concurrency modes and instance context settings and their effects on performance (though it seems that the results are only in a self hosted environment, probably not too representative of the timings you would get when hosting in IIS).

The way you manage your service's concurrency will affect its performance greatly. Ideally you want to make available as many threads as possible (try increasing the ThreadPool's minimum threads) to your service, and avoid incoming services calls to be queued up as long as your service has computational resources at it's disposal. But excessive use of multithreading will sacrifice state management and the order in which you answer client requests.

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