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In the following Code, in this line

A(A& b)

When using this compiler gives error as

c110.cpp:41: error: no matching function for call to ‘A::A(A)’

c110.cpp:8: note: candidates are: A::A(A&)

But as soon as i convert it into

A(const A& b)

Many many thanx in Advance

No error comes. Why is it so?

Code
class A
{
    public: 
    static int cnt;
    A(A& b)
    {
       cnt++;
       cout<<"cnt="<<cnt<<endl;
    }
    A()
    {
       cnt++;
       cout<<"cnt="<<cnt<<endl;
    }
    ~A()
    {
       cnt--;
       cout<<"cnt="<<cnt<<endl;
    }
};



  int A :: cnt=0;


  A fun(A b)
  {
  return b;
  }


 int main()
 {
     A a;
     A b=fun(a);
     return 0;
 }
share|improve this question
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Non-const references cannot bind to temporaries. If you pass a temporary as parameter, A& is illegal but const A& isn't.

The line

A b=fun(a);

does copy-initialization on the object returned by fun(a), which is a temporary.

Also, the copy constructor shouldn't take a non-const reference because, logically, you don't need to modify the object you're copying from.

share|improve this answer
    
But in C++ functions instead of creating temporary when returning values the address of the b is passed and it is copy-constructed with the b variable inside function – Luv Jul 4 '12 at 11:13
    
I think it is RVO(Return Value Optimization), wouldn't it take place here?? – Luv Jul 4 '12 at 11:14
2  
@Luv it can and probably will. But it doesn't matter. Just because it doesn't use something doesn't mean it doesn't have to be properly defined. – Luchian Grigore Jul 4 '12 at 11:15
    
It's not clear, Is RVO optimization taking place here? I think no else why would the temporary would be created – Luv Jul 4 '12 at 11:17
1  
@Luv I'm saying optimizations don't affect the validity of a program. If a copy constructor or whatever must be visible, it must be visible, regardless of whether it's called or not. – Luchian Grigore Jul 4 '12 at 11:52

I think its always safe to use A(const A&) type of syntax for copy construction rather than A(A&), because RVO may take place or not, its compiler dependent.

As in the above question RVO is not taking place and the temporary is been created, hence A(const A&) is safe to use.

share|improve this answer
    
It doesn't matter if RVO is taking place. Like other optimizations, it will never affect the validity of a program, regardless of compiler. – molbdnilo Jul 4 '12 at 15:24

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