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Consider you have the following code:
1. Why do we use double check lock, why single lock is not good enough, please provide detailed example.
2. What are the main drawbacks with this implementation? and how should I prove it?
Thanks.

 public sealed class SomeSingleton5  
{  
    private static SomeSingleton5 s_Instance = null;
    private static object s_LockObj = new Object();

    private SomeSingleton5() { }

    public static SomeSingleton5 Instance
    {
        get
        {
            if (s_Instance == null)
            {
                lock (s_LockObj)
                {
                    if (s_Instance == null)
                    {
                        s_Instance = new SomeSingleton5();
                    }
                }
            }

            return s_Instance;
        }
    }
}
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In .NET you don't have to use this pattern. The type system guarantees that a static field doesn't suffer from the race condition the double locking pattern tries to avoid. In Java it is different. –  Martin Liversage Jul 4 '12 at 11:37
1  
The second check is to take care of a race condition where, before s_Instance is initialized, two threads both access the getter. Both threads evaluate s_Instance as null so both proceed to the lock. One will enter, initialize s_Instance and return. The second thread will enter and if you do not have the second check, it will reinitialize s_Instance and return a new instance. Now the two threads will have two different instances of the singleton. –  Chris Sinclair Jul 4 '12 at 12:17
    
@ChrisSinclair: okay now it is clear, but I'm now wondering if this solution completely solve any race condition may occur, or we just solved the specific scenario you've mentioned. I cannot find away to map all the race conditions which may occur and therefore it is hard to understand why this solves all race conditions –  JavaSa Jul 4 '12 at 13:15
1  
Within the lock, the runtime guarantees that only 1 thread may execute at once. So it's impossible to have any other race conditions. –  Chris Sinclair Jul 4 '12 at 14:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I think the best implementation of singleton class is provided by Jon Skeet.

public sealed class Singleton
{
  private static readonly Singleton instance = new Singleton();
  public static Singleton Instance { get { return instance; } }
  static Singleton() {}
  private Singleton() {}
}

Singleton by Jon Skeet Clarification

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1  
This is indeed best approach. No locking is required. Only thing is that blank static constructor is mandatory required. –  Tilak Jul 4 '12 at 11:32
    
+1 Static initialization is indeed a very effective system for this :) –  leppie Jul 4 '12 at 11:33
    
@Tilak: Why is a blank static constructor needed? Edit: Nevermind, found answers in the links :) –  leppie Jul 4 '12 at 11:33
    
It is easy way to mitigate beforefieldinit effect. This is my understanding. csharpindepth.com/Articles/General/Beforefieldinit.aspx. My understanding may not be 100% correct, but it does ensure consistent behavior. –  Tilak Jul 4 '12 at 11:37
    
@Asif: thanks but about my implementation, why are we doing double check (ifX2), I really don't get its purpose –  JavaSa Jul 4 '12 at 12:13
  1. Aquiring a lock is expensive. Without the first if(s_Instance == null) check, a lock would be aquired each time someone accesses the singleton. But a lock actually only needs to be there during instance creation. So the first if(s_Instance == null) prevents the unnecessary locking. The second if(s_Instance == null) needs to be there because initially two threads might have evaluated the first if(s_Instance == null) as true and the two threads would thereafter instanciate s_Instance after each other inside the lock.
  2. I don't see any real drawbacks in your implementation but with the alternative (static constructor, see below) we have a solution that is simpler and involves less code. So it is more maintainable and less errorprone. Also it doesn't require locking at all. As mentioned earlier, locking is expensive.

you can improve it by using a static constructor:

public sealed class SomeSingleton5  
{  
    // the compiler will generate a static constructor containing the following code 
    // and the CLR will call it (once) before SomeSingleton5 is first acccessed
    private static SomeSingleton5 s_Instance = new SomeSingleton5();

    private SomeSingleton5() { }

    public static SomeSingleton5 Instance
    {
        get
        {
            return s_Instance;
        }
    }
}
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thanks but about my implementation, why are we doing double check (ifX2), I really don't get it's purpose –  JavaSa Jul 4 '12 at 12:14
    
I have updated my answer. Does it make sense now? –  bitbonk Jul 5 '12 at 6:36

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