Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a windows form application which needs to be the TopMost. I've set my form to be the TopMost and my application works as I'd like it to except for in one case.

There is a 3rd party application (referred to as player.exe) that displays SWF movie files on a portion of the screen that popup on top of my application.

Using Process Monitor I determined that player.exe application calls
flash.exe <PositionX> <PositionY> <Width> <Height> <MovieFile>
in my case:
flash.exe 901 96 379 261 somemovie.swf

Since flash.exe is being spawned in a new process after my form has been set to the TopMost it is appearing on top of my application.

First thing I did was make my application minimize the player.exe main application window hoping that this would prevent the Flash from appearing also. But, unfortunately it doesn't... even with the window minimized whenever the flash movie starts it shows up at the pixel location (901,96). I then tried creating a timer to keep setting the form.TopMost property to true every 10ms. This sort of works but you still see a very quick blip of the swf file.

Is there some type of Windows API call which can be used to temporarily prevent player.exe from spawning child processes which are visible? I admit it sounds a little far fetched. But, curious if anyone else has had a similar problem.


Addendum:

This addendum is to provide a reply to some of the suggestions layed out in Mathew's post below.

For the emergency situation described in the comments, I would look at possible solutions along these lines:

1) How does the third party application normally get started and stopped? Am I permitted to close it the same way? If it is a service, the Service Control Manager can stop it. If it is a regular application, sending an escape keystroke (with SendInput() perhaps) or WM_CLOSE message to its main window may work.

Easiest way to close the app is to CTRL-ALT-DEL, then kill process. -OR- The proper way is to Hold ESC while clicking the left mouse button... then input your username and password, navigate some menu's to stop the player.

There is no PAUSE command... believe it or not.

I don't think using WM_CLOSE will help since minimizing the application doesn't. Would that kill the process also? If not, how do you reopen it.

2) If I can't close it nicely, am I permitted to kill it? If so, TerminateProcess() should work.

I can't kill the process for two reasons. 1) Upon relaunch you need to supply username/password credentials... There may be a way to get around this since it doesn't prompt when the machine is rebooted but... 2) Whenever I kill the process in task manager it doesn't die gracefully and asks if you want to send an error report.

3) If I absolutely have to leave the other process running, I would try to see if I can programmatically invoke fast user switching to take me to a different session (in which there will be no competing topmost windows). I don't know where in the API to start with this one. (Peter Ruderman suggests SwitchDesktop() for this purpose in his answer.)

I got really excited by this idea... I found this article on CodeProject which provides a lot of the API Wrapper methods. I stopped implementing it because I think that in order for desktop's to work you must have explorer.exe running (which I do not).

EDIT2: On second thought... maybe explorer.exe isn't needed. I'll give it a try and report back.

Edit3: Was unable to get the code in that article working. Will have to put this on hold for a moment.


Answer Summary

As one might have expected, there is no simple answer to this problem. The best solution would be to problematically switch to a different desktop when you need to guarantee nothing will appear over it. I was unable to find a simple C# implementation of desktop switching that worked and I had a looming doubt that I would just be opening a whole new set of worms once it was implemented. Therefore, I decided not to implement the desktop switching. I did find a C++ Implementation that works well. Please post working C# virtual desktop implementations for others.

share|improve this question
    
I had a little chat with a Window the other day. It's a bottom. It said it hates how other windows completely smother it, by becoming a top. It got so sick of being a bottom all of its life, and decided it was time to become a top, too. And now all the windows are tops. And they're all competing against each other. But they have no mates, 'cause they're all tops. –  delete this account Nov 10 '13 at 17:02
    
Do you see what I'm getting at? This is a never-ending, viscious cycle that we must break. We're always going to have this problem because every window wants to be TopMost. –  delete this account Nov 10 '13 at 17:03
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Setting the TopMost property (or adding the WS_EX_TOPMOST style to a window) does not make it unique in the system. Any number of topmost windows may be created by any number of applications; the only guarantee is that all topmost windows will be drawn 'above' all non-topmost windows. If there are two or more topmost windows, the Z-order still applies. From your description, I suspect that flash.exe is also creating a topmost window.

Aside from periodically forcing your window to the top of the Z-order, I think there is little you can do. Be warned, however, that this approach is dangerous: if two or more windows are simultaneously trying to force themselves to the top of the Z-order, the result will be a flickering mess that the user will likely have to use the task manager to escape.

I recommend that your program not attempt to meddle with other processes on the computer (unless that is its explicit purpose, e.g. a task manager clone). The computer belongs to the user, and he may not value your program more highly than all others.

Addendum:

For the emergency situation described in the comments, I would look at possible solutions along these lines:

  1. How does the third party application normally get started and stopped? Am I permitted to close it the same way? If it is a service, the Service Control Manager can stop it. If it is a regular application, sending an escape keystroke (with SendInput() perhaps) or WM_CLOSE message to its main window may work.

  2. If I can't close it nicely, am I permitted to kill it? If so, TerminateProcess() should work.

  3. If I absolutely have to leave the other process running, I would try to see if I can programmatically invoke fast user switching to take me to a different session (in which there will be no competing topmost windows). I don't know where in the API to start with this one. (Peter Ruderman suggests SwitchDesktop() for this purpose in his answer.)

share|improve this answer
    
@Matthew Xavier Normally, I'd agree with your suggestion to not meddle with the user's computers. In this case, the application is for an emergency alert system. The computer is not a personal computer but a dedicated content management system which generates a video display for LCD/Plasma Screens located throughout an organization. The customer wants a way to override the content during an emergency. Any suggestions? Nice post! –  blak3r Jul 15 '09 at 19:35
    
@Matthew Xavier Thanks for all your suggestions. I replied to your addendum in the question. –  blak3r Jul 16 '09 at 23:55
add comment

Matthew's answer is excellent, but I suspect you may be asking the wrong question. Why does your application need to be topmost? If you're trying to create a kiosk or some such, then topmost is not the way to go.

Edit: After reading your response to Matthew's comment, I'd suggest creating a new desktop and switching to it before displaying your alert. (See CreateDesktop and SwitchDesktop in MSDN.)

share|improve this answer
add comment

You can use the Process class to start flash.exe directly - and use an appropriate ProcessStartInfo settings to show the window in a hidden state - or with a WindowStyle of hidden or minimized.

You could also consider using the SetWindowsHookEx API to intercept the process start API calls, and when the process is flash.exe run some code to restore you window to top-most status.

share|improve this answer
    
It is a 3rd party application which is starting flash. So, I have no control over it. I think the application was designed poorly. –  blak3r Jul 15 '09 at 17:50
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.