Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a reference file with only one column that goes like this:

file1:
a
b
c
d
e

In a second csv file I have several column. In the first of these column there are some of the value present in the reference file:

file2:
a;34;42;23;45;1
c;3;2;1;7;8
e;6;2;2;1;3

What I would like to obtain is to add the lines that are present in file1 but not in file2 with constant value for some column and zero in the last column, so to have:

a;34;42;23;45;1
b;cost1;cost2;cost3;cost4;0
c;3;2;1;7;8
d;cost1;cost2;cost3;cost4;0
e;6;2;2;1;3

Any help?,

Thanks.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted
( cat file2  ; comm -23 file1 <(cut -d';' -f1 file2) \
| sed 's/$/;cost1;cost2;cost3;cost4;0/' ) | sort

to put it in the script copy the following text in it:

( cat file2  ; comm -23 file1 <(cut -d';' -f1 file2) | sed 's/$/;cost1;cost2;cost3;cost4;0/' ) | sort

or even more adopted for human version:

( 
    cat file2
    comm -23 file1 <(cut -d';' -f1 file2) | sed 's/$/;cost1;cost2;cost3;cost4;0/' 
) | sort
share|improve this answer
    
This is ok, it will allow to go through all the line. –  g256 Jul 4 '12 at 12:07
    
@octopusgrabbus . But how to put this in a script, and not on the command line? I'm getting syntax error near unexpected token (' when lunching the script. But works in the command line. –  g256 Jul 4 '12 at 12:48
    
@g256 i added another variants that can be easily copy&pasted. –  rush Jul 4 '12 at 12:57
    
I'm still getting an syntax error near unexpected token . Could it be because I'm executing it inside a for loop for diffent file like: for i in *file; do; your code; done –  g256 Jul 4 '12 at 13:26
    
Can you show the whole code? –  rush Jul 4 '12 at 13:33
awk 'BEGIN {FS = OFS = ";"} FNR == NR {arr[$1] = $0; next} ! ($1 in arr) {print $1, "cost1;cost2;cost3;cost4;0"} END {for (i in arr) {print arr[i]}}' file2 file1

The output will be in an undefined order (except that all the new lines will be printed first). If you are using GNU AWK (gawk) and you need the lines to be sorted, you can save the new lines in the array instead of printing them immediately and use the asort() function. Otherwise, you can use the external sort utility.

Broken out on multiple lines:

awk '
    BEGIN {
        FS = OFS = ";"
    } 
    FNR == NR {
        arr[$1] = $0; 
        next
    } 
    ! ($1 in arr) {
        print $1, "cost1;cost2;cost3;cost4;0"
    } 
    END {
        for (i in arr) {
            print arr[i]
        }
    }' file2 file1

Edit:

To accommodate multiple lines in file2 with the same field 1, change this line:

        arr[$1] = $0;

to

        arr[$1]

and add this line immediately after it:

        lines[$0]

Then change these lines:

        for (i in arr) {
            print arr[i]

to

        for (i in lines) {
            print i

Edit 2:

To print the added line 10 times with different values change this section:

    ! ($1 in arr) {
        print $1, "cost1;cost2;cost3;cost4;0"
    } 

to

    ! ($1 in arr) {
        for (i = 1; i <= 10; i++) {
            print $1, "cost1", i, "cost3;cost4;0"
        }
    } 
share|improve this answer
    
This works really well. The only problem is that in file2 each line can be repeated more than one. So for example more than one line with a or c or d. And with this code at the end just one line will be report for each value. Hope this is clear. Thanks a lot anyway. This was really useful. –  g256 Jul 4 '12 at 12:01
1  
@g256: That condition was not specified in the question. Please see my edited answer for changes that should accommodate it. –  Dennis Williamson Jul 4 '12 at 13:35
    
Thanks a lot it works. –  g256 Jul 4 '12 at 14:43
    
Slightly change: If I would like to insert the missing lines let's say 10 times with 10 different constant in the position of const2? (of course for all the missing line) would this be difficult? Thanks for support. –  g256 Jul 4 '12 at 16:28
1  
@g256: Please see my edited answer. –  Dennis Williamson Jul 4 '12 at 18:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.