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I have seen this on a program that I am tinkering:

static const void *method()
{
 // other code
 return anotherMethod(param1,param2);
}

For what I understand, this will return a pointer to a function. Now based on this, I am trying to figure it what the static const void are applied to:

int f(void);
int *fip(); //Function returning int pointer
int (*pfi)(); //Pointer to function returning int

So what are the real advantages of adding the static const (assuming this is applied to the return valued of the appointed function). Also, will the return pointer to a function be called? Or it's just a pointer to it? Because from the code I have the following:

void start()
{
  method();
}

I am assuming it will be called, otherwise it would have been assigned to a pointer.

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1  
Just a sidenote: I believe you are confusing C and C++. In C++, start() means start(void) and the former is encouraged style. But in C, start() means "function accepting various junk parameters in hope for subtle bugs". In C you should always write start(void). A function with no parameters is flagged as an obsolete feature in the C standard and might be removed from the language in the future (see C11 6.11.6). –  Lundin Jul 4 '12 at 14:14
    
I am actually using on a objective-c context and the name of the method was completely arbitrary. But thanks for the side note.. –  RuiAAPeres Jul 4 '12 at 14:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

No, the function will return a const void* and the static restricts the visibility of the function to file scope.

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Ok, so if I don't care about the returning, is there a good reason to actually return a const void*? Is it a good practice? –  RuiAAPeres Jul 4 '12 at 14:07
3  
It informs the caller that returned value is not to be modified, so yes it is useful. However, the constness can be casted away but at least the intention is clear and the caller has to intentionally cast it away, rather than accidentally modify it. –  hmjd Jul 4 '12 at 14:08

static means that the function is private to the compilation unit (the source file) and not visible outside of it.

const void * means that the return value is a pointer to constant memory, i.e. memory that should not be written to.

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static keyword before a function does not mean it will return a static variable. it just means that the function is "static". that means this function is not accessible from a "external" object like object file compiled from another source file.

The example you have given, will return

const void*

And will refused to link to any external references to this function.

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static const void *method()

It returns a "const void*". This could be a function pointer cast into a void*, but in general this shouldn't be the case.

void start()
{
  method();
}

In here, the caller simply isn't interested in the result. Nothing magic happening at all.

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