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Consider the following code:

interface IFace {}

abstract class Supertype {}

class Subtype1 extends Supertype implements IFace {}
class Subtype2 extends Supertype implements IFace {}
class Subtype3 extends Supertype {}

class Foo {
    //Contains elements of Subtype1 and Subtype2
    List<IFace>     ifaceList = new ArrayList<IFace>();

    //Contains elements of Subtype1, Subtype2, and Subtype3
    List<Supertype> superList = new ArrayList<Supertype>();   

    void CopyItem() {
        superList.add( (Supertype) ifaceList.someElement() );
    }
}

Is it safe to cast an IFace element to Supertype if I know that only Subtypes will implement IFace? Is it even possible to ensure that only Subtypes will implement IFace?

I'm trying to use IFace as a marker interface to keep only certain Subtypes in the first list and allow any Subtypes in the second list.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Is it safe to cast an IFace element to Supertype if I know that only Subtypes will implement IFace?

Yes.

Is it even possible to ensure that?

If you mean "is it possible to ensure that only subclasses of Supertype implement IFace" - no. An interface can be implemented by anything.

If you mean "is it possible to ensure that the cast will succeed" - yes, you can use instanceof before casting.

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instanceof? ..... (I understand your point about but you get mine too I suppose). –  assylias Jul 4 '12 at 14:07
    
@assylias: Not sure what you mean here. You can ensure that the cast is safe, but that's not what the OP was looking to ensure, as far as I can tell. –  Jon Skeet Jul 4 '12 at 14:08
    
That's what I meant yes. Not sure if it is / isn't the question. –  assylias Jul 4 '12 at 14:08
    
Consider IFace a marker interface to ensure that only certain Subtypes are in the first list, but any Subtype can be in the second. Is there a better way? –  Brian Templeton Jul 4 '12 at 14:24
    
@BrianTempleton: Ah, I see - while all implementations of IFace are Supertype subclasses, not all subclasses implement IFace. I've removed the last part of my answer. –  Jon Skeet Jul 4 '12 at 14:36

The safest way would be having Supertype implement IFace. If that's not possible, then it's safe to cast an IFace element to Supertype as long as every class that implement IFace is also a Supertype subclass. You'll have to assure that holds true for the time being, which is rather error-prone.

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Is it safe to cast an IFace element to Supertype if I know that only Subtypes will implement IFace?

If you know for sure that all IFace elements also extends Supertype then it won't be a problem. But in the future this may not be true anymore.

Is it even possible to ensure that?

Yes. You can try catch on the ClassCastException or even better test it before cast with operator instanceof

void CopyItem() {
    IFace obj = ifaceList.someElement();
    if (obj instanceof Supertype) superList.add( (Supertype)obj );
    else System.err.println("WARNING: IFace object is not a Supertype.");
}
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Is it safe to cast an IFace element to Supertype if I know that only Subtypes will implement IFace?

If you know your code, and every class that implements IFace is also a subclass of Supertype, there is no problem, but you can always check for Supertype using the instanceof operator, to be sure.

Is it even possible to ensure that?

Consider the following modification to your code:

interface IFace {}

abstract class Supertype {}

abstract class SupertypeAndFace extends Supertype implements IFace {}

class Subtype1 extends SupertypeAndFace {}
class Subtype2 extends SupertypeAndFace {}
class Subtype3 extends Supertype {}

class Foo {
    //Contains elements of Subtype1 and Subtype2
    List<SupertypeAndFace> ifaceList = new ArrayList<SupertypeAndFace>();

    //Contains elements of Subtype1, Subtype2, and Subtype3
    List<Supertype>        superList = new ArrayList<Supertype>();   

    void CopyItem() {
        superList.add(ifaceList.someElement());
    }
}

There, the cast is not neccesary, as you ensure that every instance of SupertypeAndFace extends Supertype and implements IFace.

After all, if Supertype and IFace are so related that you know that all (or at least most) of the clases that implements IFace also are subclasses of Supertype, maybe you need that new abstraction.

But, if you also want ifaceList to contain other elements that implements IFace, but are not subtypes of Supertype, this solution is not valid. If that is the case, you can use the instanceof operator to check for the safety of the cast, as explained by other answers.

void CopyItem() {
    if (ifaceList.someElement() instanceof Supertype) {
        superList.add( (Supertype) ifaceList.someElement() );
    } else {
        // Throw exception if necessary
    }
}
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