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I'm communicating with a third party library where I need to acquire and the release an unmanaged resource. After some reading I came to the conclusion that best and 'correct' way to manage the resource reference was in either a SafeHandle or CriticalHandle object.

My problem arises because the handles returned by the third party library are unsigned short numeric values as opposed to pointers. If I specify the MarshalAsAttribute on the returned handle I get a MarshalDirectiveException (CriticalHandles must not have a MarshalAs attribute set and cannot be used in arrays).

Here are the things that I've considered:

  • Marshal the handles in their numeric format and wrap them in a CriticalHandle via the Criticalhandle.SetHandle Method. This allows the potential to leak a handle if an exception is raised between obtaining the reference and encapsulating it.
  • Marshal and store the handles in their numeric format. Have the containing type implement CriticalFinalizerObject. This allows the potential to leak a handle if an exception is raised between obtaining the reference and encapsulating it.
  • Marshal the handles into a SafeHandle as an IntPtr (letting the most significant 2 bytes fill with quasi-garbage). Cast the DangerousGetHandle back down to a short (discarding the most significant 2 bytes of garbage) every time I need to invoke a native method with the SafeHandle. This will prevent the any potential leaks of the handle but is very cumbersome and has the appearance of using brute force to make the wrong solution work.

How should I handle these 'handles'?

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1  
You can make SafeHandle work if your native code is 32-bits. A short argument always gets promoted to int in a C or C++ function call. The IntPtr won't confuse it. –  Hans Passant Jul 4 '12 at 15:10
    
This reassures me a bit but that leave me wondering why extra data is sometimes filled into the most significant 2 bytes in the returned value. IE: Sometimes the upper 2 bytes contain the bit pattern of all 0's and other times contain the bit pattern of 0x0091. While I know the scenarios that lead to both circumstances I have no clue what the extra bits represent. Perhaps this is something specific to my library that I should investigate. Thanks. –  Chris Kerekes Jul 4 '12 at 15:22
    
@HansPassant This worked very nicely for me. May you post this as an answer so that I may accept it? –  Chris Kerekes Jul 11 '12 at 14:55
    
@HansPassant I have posted your comment as an answer (and marked it as the answer). –  Chris Kerekes Jul 18 '12 at 14:53

2 Answers 2

I think the correct thing to do here is implement your own wrapper similar to SafeHandle (and derived from CriticalFinalizerObject. Then wrap the call to your P/Invoke method that creates the handle in a constrained execution region to ensure the managed handle wrapper is properly initialized.

NOTE: I haven't had to use a CER before, so without verification I can only hope this code provides you with a starting point.

[DllImport("blah.dll")]
private static extern ushort CreateMySpecialHandle();

public static SafeSpecial Handle Foo()
{
    SafeSpecialHandle safeHandle = new SafeSpecialHandle();
    System.Runtime.CompilerServices.RuntimeHelpers.PrepareConstrainedRegions();
    try
    {
    }
    finally
    {
        ushort rawHandle = CreateMySpecialHandle();
        safeHandle.SetHandle(rawHandle);
    }

    if (safeHandle.IsInvalid)
    {
        // throw exception here, or other error handling
    }

    return safeHandle;
}
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I read this article but was left uncertain as to what qualified as an 'out-of-band' exception. Without this I'm unable to determine if there are scenarios where CreateMySpecialhandle() will execute and obtain a handle but not have it saved inside the SafeHandle. –  Chris Kerekes Jul 11 '12 at 14:55
    
This example seems to be reinforced by the nearly identical snippet with additional information found in the MSDN RuntimeHelpers.PrepareConstrainedRegions method documentation. –  Chris Kerekes Jul 11 '12 at 15:06
up vote 1 down vote accepted

As @HansPassant mentioned in a comment to my question:

You can make SafeHandle work if your native code is 32-bits. A short argument always gets promoted to int in a C or C++ function call. The IntPtr won't confuse it. – Hans Passant Jul 4 at 15:10

It is therefore possible to marshal a C/C++ unsigned short directly into a derivative of SafeHandle.

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