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I have a function, and I want to return an array of int , but I don't want to create a variable just for doing that, like this

 int* foo()
 {
       static int bar[]={1,2,3}; // edit thanks to comments
       return bar;
 }

To get around that, I tried this:

       return (Uint8Type*)   gAppCanContext.BluetoothMacAddr[0] + MacAddr[1] + '-'\
               + gAppCanContext.BluetoothMacAddr[2] + MacAddr[3] + '-' ;

But it doesn't work. I also tried this:

return (Uint8Type*[]){ MacAddr[0] , MacAddr[1] + '-' MacAddr[3] ... };

It compiles with a warning and if I execute the program, it freezes. I tried playing a bit with asterisks and ampersands too but I couldn't get it to work properly.

Is it even possible? If so, how?

Added: I cant use malloc - is a embedded System with no dynamic allocation.

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6  
Your foo function doesn't actually work. Apart from your storing strings in an int[], using its return value causes undefined behavior. Use malloc. –  larsmans Jul 4 '12 at 14:40
    
You can't concatenate strings that way in C. Strings are just pointers--addition changes the pointer offset rather than appending characters. –  Jonathan Grynspan Jul 4 '12 at 14:45
    
So, disregarding the problems with your code, why the hate for variables? –  Ed S. Jul 4 '12 at 19:02
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5 Answers

It compiles with a warning and if I execute the program, it freezes.

That warning tells you you're returning the address of an object that's about to die so it's illegal to access it after the function invocation ends.

Is it even possible? If so, how?

  • You can malloc some memory and return a pointer to it
  • You can use a static object, as mentioned by Electro.
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Or a static array. –  Electro Jul 4 '12 at 14:42
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int* foo()
{
   int bar[]={"aa","bb","cc"};
   return bar;
}

No can do. C doesn't really have "arrays"; when you return bar it will really just return a pointer to the first element of bar, which will be gone by the time you arrive back in the caller.

Besides that, you might want to decide whether you want "strings" or ints in your array :-)

You could stick an array into a struct

struct Weird
{
    int bar[3];
}

and return that:

struct Weird foo(void)
{
    struct Weird bar;
    bar.bar[0]=1;
    bar.bar[1]=5;
    bar.bar[2]=10;
    return bar;
}

Still, I'm not sure that's what you want. My guess is that you really want to get familiar with C :-)

You can also get your first example to work if you do

int* foo()
{
   static int bar[]={1,2,3};
   return bar;
}

But, of course, that will only create one instance of the array -- so if you are modifying it, all those returns will be changed.

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i want to get better, i can to the easy way or find the short way. –  Thomas Jul 4 '12 at 14:59
1  
C does have arrays –  Jens Gustedt Jul 4 '12 at 18:47
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if the data in foo is NOT dynamic, you can try this:

const char *foo(void)
{
    static const char *bar[] = {"aa", "bb", "cc"};
    return bar;
}

with the help of 'static', the data won't vanish when it goes out of scope.

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Might want to add a type to bar, too. –  unwind Jul 4 '12 at 14:45
1  
also, reenterability is a big issue –  unkulunkulu Jul 4 '12 at 14:45
1  
Please note however that this is very bad practice. It is not object-oriented design and it is also not thread-safe. –  Lundin Jul 4 '12 at 14:45
    
yes i missed type to bar... please use static const char *bar[] –  Rango Jul 4 '12 at 14:56
    
@Rango, you can (and should) edit your answer rather than posting this in the comments (there's an edit link below the answer). Moreover, you can edit anyone's answers and questions. We could've edited yours but we left it up to you so you get used to it, cheers. –  unkulunkulu Jul 4 '12 at 15:00
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Unless the standard has changed, C returns values that can be returned in a register. So, in your case, your function would return a pointer to a character string.

How you create that character string is up to you taking into account best practices.

You could declare a static array in a function and return a pointer to it:

char * cp1()
{
    static char szForeverBuf[100] = {0};

    return (char * ) &szForeverBuf;
}

This could be an okay way to handle things, if cp1 is called once at startup, but called more than once could and probably would result in errors, because the function is only returning the address of a buffer created at compile time.

In other words, function cp1 returns a character pointer, whose value never changes, each time cp1 is called. Hence, this is why the function might be useful at startup.

You could also create dynamic memory like this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

char * cp2(int nSizeP)
{
    char *pszForeverBuf = NULL;
    int nSize = 0;

    if (0 >= nSizeP)
    {
        nSize = 100;
    }
    else
    {
        nSize = nSizeP + 1;
    }

    pszForeverBuf = (char *) malloc((nSize + 1) * sizeof(char));

    return pszForeverBuf; 
}

You will need to store the value of pszForeverBuf somewhere, so when you no longer want to use the memory, you can free it using pszForeverBuf -- free(pszForeverBuf).

And finally -- more advanced -- you can create a huge static block of storage, and then manipulate it with functions that perform memory housekeeping. However, that is used in advanced cases, when you don't want to call malloc a lot of times.

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First, functions in C can't return array values, only pointers. Then you can't return a dynamic "stack" allocated object, as already noted by others, since such an object ceases to exist when you return from the function.

The easiest I find to deal with such things is to pass (a pointer to) the array into the function as an argument:

int* foo(int bar[3]) {
  // fill the array here

  return bar;
}

This lets you call your function with two different allocation strategies

int* aMalloc = foo(malloc(sizeof(int[3])));
int* aLocal = foo((int[3]){ 0 });

and you could then even wrap these two forms into macros, to ease your coding:

#define fooMalloc() foo(malloc(sizeof(int[3])))
#define fooLocal() foo((int[3]){ 0 })

so the code above then would read

int* aMalloc = fooMalloc();
int* aLocal = fooLocal();
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