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I have a version of bubble sort:

int i, j;  

for i from n downto 1 
{
    for j from 1 to i-1 
    { 
        if (A[j] > A[j+1])
            swap(A[j], A[j+1]) 
    } 
}

I want to calculate the expected number of swaps using the above version of bubble sort. The method used by me is shown below :

// 0 based index

float ans = 0.0;

for ( int i = 0; i < n-1; i++ )
{
    for ( int j = i+1; j < n; j++ ) {

        ans += getprob( a[i], a[j]); // computes probability that a[i]>a[j].
    }
}

Am i going the correct way or am I missing something?

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7  
Why don't you run this on a randomised dataset, and find out? –  Oliver Charlesworth Jul 4 '12 at 14:49
2  
"The number of" somethings is rarely float. And I don't understand getprob() at all, it gets the numbers, so it can just ... answer exactly, what's with the probability? –  unwind Jul 4 '12 at 14:52
1  
This is probably easier to solve on paper than in a program. –  larsmans Jul 4 '12 at 14:54
    
@unwind The number is float because i have to calculate the expected number of swaps, and I have to make it for a general case when an element a[i] > a[j] ( i < j ) with some probability p. –  TheRock Jul 4 '12 at 15:22
    
see this answer. –  Nicholas Mancuso Aug 9 '12 at 13:54

3 Answers 3

The best way to get the answer is by running the bubble-sort algorithm itself and including a counter after the swap() call. Your calculation function would (a) need almost as long as the sort itself (depending on the runtime of swap() vs. getprob()) and (b) miss the point that the order of the elements changes while sorting.

Btw, the exact number of swap() calls depends on the data you need to sort - you have n*(n-1)/2 comparisions and any of them could result in a swap (on average, half of the time you need to swap the compared elements).

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@C Stoll: I get your point that on average half of the time you need to swap the compared elements but this has a assumption that each element a[i] > a[j] ( i < j ) with a probability of 1/2. But I need for something when I previously know that a[i] > a[j] ( i < j ) with a probability p, thus it doesn't include the complexity of bubble sort. My getprob() function works in O(1) time. As far as I understand number of swaps basically depends on the number of inversions of the array. –  TheRock Jul 4 '12 at 15:26
    
@TheRock The number of swaps is the number of inversions in the array. If all array entries are different and the permutation is uniformly distributed, the expected number of swaps is simply n*(n-1)/4. If getprob() is independent of the values/positions, p*n*(n-1)/2. But you seem to have some more complicated constraints. –  Daniel Fischer Jul 4 '12 at 15:32
    
@DanielFischer : I don't have to do for the general case actually in my case each of array elements can change with some probabilty, and i can get the probability of a[i] > a[j] ( i < j ). Then I need the expected number of swaps to sort the array using bubble sort. –  TheRock Jul 4 '12 at 15:36
    
@TheRock: What do you want to do when you know the number of swaps needed for sorting? (btw, swap() typically works in O(1) time too - at least for build-in types and STL classes) –  C. Stoll Jul 5 '12 at 5:52
    
@C.Stoll : As there are different possible configurations of the array, So I have calculate the expected number of swaps that would take place o sort the array using bubble sort. I have listed all constraints here stackoverflow.com/questions/11340223/… . –  TheRock Jul 5 '12 at 8:18

Maybe this helps. Basically this provides a framework to run bubble sorts on a set of simulation datasets and to calculate the swap probability.

Let this probability = p Then to find the expected number of swap operations, you need to apply this on a real dataset. Let n be the size of this dataset. Then expected number = swapProbability * n * n

n*n comes because the bubble sort has n * n number of expected operations.

float computeSwapProbability()
{
    int aNumSwaps = 0
    int aTotalNumberOfOperations = 0

    For all simulation datasets
    {


        int i, j;  

        for i from n downto 1 

        { 

            for j from 1 to i-1 

            { 
                aTotalNumberOfOperations++

                if (A[j] > A[j+1]) 
                {
                    swap(A[j], A[j+1]) 
                    aNumSwaps++
                }

            } 

        }
    }

    return (float)aNumSwaps/aTotalNumberOfOperations;
}
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The best way to count swap is to include counter variable inside swap if condition .

    int swapCount=0;

    for (i = 0; i < (length-1); ++i) {
      for (j = 0; j < (length-i-1); ++j) {
        if(array[j] > array[j+1]) {
          temp = array[j+1];
          array[j+1] = array[j];
          array[j] = temp;
          swapCount++;
        }
      }
    }

    printf("Swap count : %d" ,swapCount);
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