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How do I create a function that is globally available?

Right now, the application is structured as follows:

  • A distinct template for each kind of request (e.g. distinct templates for a book, an author or a publisher), e.g.:
  • Each of these templates is decorated with common elements from a macro in page.ftl, e.g.:
[#ftl]
[#macro decorate]
<html>
  <head>
  <!-- some stuff here -->
  </head>
  <body>
    <header><!-- more stuff here --></header>
    <div id="main-content">[#nested /]</div>
    <footer><!-- more stuff here --></footer>
  </body>
</html>
[/#macro]

So, book.ftl would look something like:

[#ftl]
[#include page.ftl p]
[@p.decorate]
<h1>Book: The Bible</h1>
<dl>
  <dt>Author:</dt>
  <dd>God</dd>
</dl>

[#-- HERE'S THE IMPORTANT BIT --]
[@myFunctionHere('The Bible') /]

[#-- I ALSO NEED TO BE ABLE TO CALL myFunction IN INCLUDED PAGES TOO --]
[#import "_partial.ftl" /]

[/@p.decorate]

I would like to create a global function that would be defined and included once and available everywhere (in book.ftl and others, plus any templates it happens to import/include).

How would I go about this, preferably without it's own namespace?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Just to ensure that it's clear: #include-d templates share name-space with the including template, so if you want that, just don't use #import. The point of #import is exactly that the templates don't share name-space. If you want those separate name-spaces, yet you want to share some macros/functions, then the templates could still #import each-other.

If you really want some functions/macros to become global, then after you have defined them, you can copy them into the global name-space like this:

[#macro myMacro]
   ...
[/#macro]
[#global myMacro = myMacro]

After this you can issue [@myMacro /] everywhere.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh cool, didn't realise that functions and macros were objects that could be used like that. –  BenLanc Jul 4 '12 at 22:37

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