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can i declare a method in an object as static and a nonstatic method with the same name that calls the static method?

i want to create a class that has a static method "send" and a nonstatic method that calls the static function for example:

class test {
    private $text;
    public static function instance() {
        return new test();
    }

    public function setText($text) {
        $this->text = $text;
        return $this;
    }

    public function send() {
        self::send($this->text);
    }

    public static function send($text) {
        // send something
    }
}

i want to be able to call the function on these two was

test::send("Hello World!");

and

test::instance()->setText("Hello World")->send();

is it possible?

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4  
Why would you want to do that if I may ask? –  PeeHaa Jul 4 '12 at 15:08
    
    
The answer is no btw, but I'm really curious as to why you think you want to do that. –  PeeHaa Jul 4 '12 at 15:11
    
The problem here is you can't have function overloading like this. PHP doesn't support same function/method names even with different parameters –  Marcus Recck Jul 4 '12 at 15:13
    
Why do you need a static function? –  Jonathan Egerton Jul 4 '12 at 15:15
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4 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You can do this, but it's a bit tricky. You have to do it with overloading: the __call and __callStatic magic methods.

class test {
    private $text;
    public static function instance() {
        return new test();
    }

    public function setText($text) {
        $this->text = $text;
        return $this;
    }

    public function sendObject() {
        self::send($this->text);
    }

    public static function sendText($text) {
        // send something
    }

    public function __call($name, $arguments) {
        if ($name === 'send') {
            call_user_func(array($this, 'sendObject'));
        }
    }

    public function __callStatic($name, $arguments) {
        if ($name === 'send') {
            call_user_func(array('test', 'sendText'), $arguments[0]);
        }
    }
}

This isn't an ideal solution, as it makes your code harder to follow, but it will work, provided you have PHP >= 5.3.

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8  
This makes my eyes b̢̗̫͕l͓̫͈e҉͍̖͙ḙ̣̭̦̫̞͟d̼. I won't downvote it, because you've warned him that this kind of coding will not ease his life, and it is helpful. But still :< –  Second Rikudo Jul 4 '12 at 15:22
4  
@lonesomeday Up voting just because you have the patience to write out the code which pretty much has no tangible use! yet answers the question :-) –  Nicholas King Jul 4 '12 at 15:26
2  
@Truth Yes. It should be "you can do this, but you really shouldn't." –  lonesomeday Jul 4 '12 at 15:26
    
thanks for the answer.. its true that this solution is not easy to follow for another person.. so i wont use it.. but its the solution for my problem so thanks a lot –  alphanyx Jul 4 '12 at 15:59
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I agree that this should be avoided at all costs but there are some cases where it might be useful.

In most cases it will just make your code unreadable and unmanageable.

Believe me, I have been down that path.

Here is an example with a use case scenario where it might still be practical.

I am extending CakePHP 3.0's File class as my default file handling class.

I wanted a to put in a static mime type guesser.

In some cases I have a filename instead of an actual file and some assumptions need to be made in this case. ( if the file exists, try to get the mime from it else use extention of filename provided)

Other times if I actually instantiated an object the default mime() method should work but if it fails the filename needs to be extracted from the object and the static method should be called instead.

To avoid confusion my aim was to get the mime type by calling the same method:

Static:

NS\File::type('path/to/file.txt')

As object

$f = new NS\File('path/to/file.txt');
$f->type();

Here is my example extended class:

<?php

namespace NS;

class File extends \Cake\Utility\File
{

    public function __call($method, $args) {
        return call_user_func_array([get_called_class(), 'obj'.ucfirst($method)], $args);
    }
    public static function __callStatic($method, $args) {
        return call_user_func_array([get_called_class(), 'static'.ucfirst($method)], $args);
    }

    public function objType($filename=null){
        $mime = false;
        if(!$filename){
            $mime = $this->mime();
            $filename = $this->path;
        }
        if(!$mime){
            $mime = static::getMime($filename);
        }
        return $mime;
    }

    public static function staticType($filename=null){
        return static::getMime($filename);
    }

    public static function getMime($filename = null)
    {
        $mimes = [
            'txt' => 'text/plain',
            'htm' => 'text/html',
            'html' => 'text/html',
            'php' => 'text/html',
            'ctp' => 'text/html',
            'twig' => 'text/html',
            'css' => 'text/css',
            'js' => 'application/javascript',
            'json' => 'application/json',
            'xml' => 'application/xml',
            'swf' => 'application/x-shockwave-flash',
            'flv' => 'video/x-flv',
            // images
            'png' => 'image/png',
            'jpe' => 'image/jpeg',
            'jpeg' => 'image/jpeg',
            'jpg' => 'image/jpeg',
            'gif' => 'image/gif',
            'bmp' => 'image/bmp',
            'ico' => 'image/vnd.microsoft.icon',
            'tiff' => 'image/tiff',
            'tif' => 'image/tiff',
            'svg' => 'image/svg+xml',
            'svgz' => 'image/svg+xml',
            // archives
            'zip' => 'application/zip',
            'rar' => 'application/x-rar-compressed',
            'exe' => 'application/x-msdownload',
            'msi' => 'application/x-msdownload',
            'cab' => 'application/vnd.ms-cab-compressed',
            // audio/video
            'mp3' => 'audio/mpeg',
            'qt' => 'video/quicktime',
            'mov' => 'video/quicktime',
            // adobe
            'pdf' => 'application/pdf',
            'psd' => 'image/vnd.adobe.photoshop',
            'ai' => 'application/postscript',
            'eps' => 'application/postscript',
            'ps' => 'application/postscript',
            // ms office
            'doc' => 'application/msword',
            'rtf' => 'application/rtf',
            'xls' => 'application/vnd.ms-excel',
            'ppt' => 'application/vnd.ms-powerpoint',
            // open office
            'odt' => 'application/vnd.oasis.opendocument.text',
            'ods' => 'application/vnd.oasis.opendocument.spreadsheet',
        ];
        $e = explode('.', $filename);
        $ext = strtolower(array_pop($e));
        if (array_key_exists($ext, $mimes)) {
            $mime = $mimes[$ext];
        } elseif (function_exists('finfo_open') && is_file($filename)) {
            $finfo = finfo_open(FILEINFO_MIME);
            $mime = finfo_file($finfo, $filename);
            finfo_close($finfo);
        } else {
            $mime = 'application/octet-stream';
        }
        return $mime;
    }
}
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Sorry for bumping an old thread, but I would like to expand on @lonesomeday 's answer. (Thanks @lonesomeday for the initial code sample.)

I was also experimenting with this as well, but did not want to call the methods as he called them in the original post. Instead I have the following, which seems to work:

    class Emailer {

    private $recipient;

    public function to( $recipient )
    {
        $this->recipient = $recipient;
        return $this;
    }

    public function sendNonStatic()
    {
        self::mailer( $this->recipient );
    }

    public static function sendStatic( $recipient )
    {
        self::mailer( $recipient );
    }

    public function __call( $name, $arguments )
    {
        if ( $name === 'send' ) {
            call_user_func( array( $this, 'sendNonStatic' ) );
        }
    }

    public static function mailer( $recipient )
    {
        // send()
        echo $recipient . '<br>';
    }

    public static function __callStatic( $name, $arguments )
    {
        if ( $name === 'send' ) {
            call_user_func( array( 'Emailer', 'sendStatic' ), $arguments[0] );
        }
    }
}

Emailer::send( 'foo@foo.foo' );

$Emailer = new Emailer;
$Emailer->to( 'bar@bar.bar' );
$Emailer->send();
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No you can't have two methods with the same name. You could do basicly the same thing by renaming one of the methods. Renaming test::send("Hello World!"); to test::sendMessage("Hello World!"); would work. I would just create the a single send method with an optional text argument that changes how the method functions.

public function send($text = false) {
    if (!$text) {
        $text = $this -> text;
    }

    // Send something
}

I courious as to why you need the static function at all.

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2  
Renaming the static method is definitely the sensible way to do this. –  lonesomeday Jul 4 '12 at 15:27
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