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Is there any explanation to NullReference exception, that occured at one machine today. I cannot reproduce it at my computer....

class Test
{
  Timer timer_;
  public void Init()
  {
    timer_ = new Timer();
    timer_.Interval = 10000;
    timer_.Tick += OnTimerTick;
    timer_.Start();
  }

  private void OnTimerTick(object sender, EventArgs e)
  {
    timer_.Stop();
    timer_ = null; <--- Null Ref occurs
  }
}

Solution based on awesome advices of Mark Hall and Rich Okelly

private void OnTimerTick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    var localTimer = Interlocked.Exchange(ref timer_, null);
    if (localTimer != null)
    {
        localTimer.Stop();
        localTimer.Tick -= OnTimerTick;
        localTimer.Dispose();

        // doing staff
    }
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think the null reference exception actually occurs the line above: at timer_.Stop().

What happened was the Tick event was raised and another scheduled, the timer was stopped and set to null as a result of the first Tick event. The second Tick event then tries to call Stop on the Timer, which is now null.

You can use the Interlocked methods to work around this:

private void OnTimerTick(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  var localTimer= Interlocked.Exchange(ref timer_, null);
  if (localTimer != null) 
  {
     localTimer.Stop();
  }
}
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Thanks Rich. But i have System.Windows.Forms.Timer –  user1266063 Jul 4 '12 at 15:33
    
Thank you soooooo much! –  user1266063 Jul 4 '12 at 15:38

Try removing your OnTimerTick event before setting your timer to null. That will prevent it from being raised while you are setting it to null, but since you are creating a 10 sec one-shot that is unlikely, try disposing of your timer before setting it to null;

i.e.

private void OnTimerTick(object sender, EventArgs e) 
{ 
    timer_.Stop(); 
    timer_.Tick -= OnTimerTick;
    timer_.Dispose();
    timer_ = null; 
}
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Thanks Mark. But i cannot understand why it can be fired from Tick event after stopping... –  user1266063 Jul 4 '12 at 15:35
    
Thanks i will try your answer too... –  user1266063 Jul 4 '12 at 15:39
    
thanks. i wish i could thumb up your answer too, but that box says i have not enough 'reputation'... –  user1266063 Jul 4 '12 at 15:52

You said you are using System.Windows.Forms.Timer, the documentation says :

This Windows timer is designed for a single-threaded environment where UI threads are used to perform processing.It requires that the user code have a UI message pump available and always operate from the same thread, or marshal the call onto another thread.

So using Interlocked.Exchange isn't needed, this is not a concurrency issue.

You can try the following code :

  public void Init()       
  {       
    if (timer_ != null)
      throw new InvalidOperationException("Already initialized!");
    timer_ = new Timer();       
    timer_.Interval = 10000;       
    timer_.Tick += OnTimerTick;       
    timer_.Start();       
  }       


  private void OnTimerTick(object sender, EventArgs e) 
  { 
    if (timer_ != null)
    {
      timer_.Stop();
      timer_.Dispose();
      timer_ = null;

      // Your code
    }
  } 

This way, on the first tick timer_ will be stopped and set to null. If there is any pending Tick, it will be ignored thanks to (timer_ != null).

Moreover if Init() is called while the timer is running (probably a bug) you will see it soon.

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