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I want to grep through logs, and gather a certain exception stacktrace but I want to only see those that do not contain certain keywords in --after-context. I do not know in which line in after-context the keyword is.

Simple example - given this shell code:

grep -A 2 A <<EOF
A
B
C 
R
A
Z
Z
X
EOF

the output is:

A
B
C 
--
A
Z
Z

I'd like the output to be:

A
Z
Z

I want to exclude any match that has 'B' in after-context

How do I do this? Using grep is not a requirement, though I only have access to coreutils and perl.

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closed as off topic by trojanfoe, shellter, Prince John Wesley, Fionnuala, Evan Mulawski Jul 4 '12 at 20:49

Questions on Stack Overflow are expected to relate to programming within the scope defined by the community. Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Sorry, not a programming question, voting to move to superuser.com OR you can 'flag' it and ask for a moderator to move i. (I didn't downvote your question). Good luck. –  shellter Jul 4 '12 at 15:32
7  
are you from wikipedia? shell is programming (perl too) –  Łukasz Gruner Jul 4 '12 at 15:38
5  
Disagree - this is a question about how to use particular shell programming tools. And this is categorically not about things requiring super-user privileges, so SuperUser is not appropriate. –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 4 '12 at 16:07
2  
this is sad, people with 30k+ reputations, would not consider this as software tools commonly used by programmer –  tuxuday Jul 5 '12 at 4:47
1  
also, from faq: * software tools commonly used by programmers practical, * answerable problems that are unique to the programming profession –  Łukasz Gruner Jul 5 '12 at 8:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This problem is a good fit for awk:

 grep -A2 A LOG_FILE | awk -v RS='--\n' '!/B/ { printf "%s", $0 }'
  • `-v RS='--\n' sets the record separator.
  • !/B/ finds records that do not contain B.
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I've tried all the proposed solution. This is, indeed, the best! –  Zagorax Jul 4 '12 at 17:19

You might do:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;
my $pushok = 0;
my @group;
while (<DATA>) {
    chomp;
    if ( m/A/ ) {
        $pushok = 1;
        push @group, $_;
        next;
    }
    if ( m/B/ ) {
        $pushok = 0;
        @group  = ();
        next;
    }
    $pushok and push @group, $_;

    if ( @group == 3 ) {
        print +(join "\n", @group), "\n";
        $pushok = 0;
        @group  = ();
    }
}
__DATA__
A
B
C 
R
A
Z
Z
X
AAA
BBB
AAA
XXX
XXX

Which would produce:

A
Z
Z
ZZZ AAA
XXX
XXX
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This is in perl.

use strict;
my $Data = join '',<DATA>;

while( $Data =~ /(A\s+\w\s+\w)/msg ) {
    my $Match = $1;
    next if $Match =~ /B/;
    print $Match;

}

__DATA__
A
B
C 
R
A
Z
Z
X
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You could try

sed -ne '/A/{N;N;/\n.*B/d;p;i --' -e '}'

It seems to do what you need, except for the trailing --.

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