Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using a web application which runs on WebSphere and interacts with an Oracle database (using the AL32UTF8 character set).

If I use the web application to input some text and then press the "save" button, I expect the text to be saved to a CLOB field in the Oracle database. There is functionality in the web application to view the text by retrieving it from the database.

When I input text containing the euro sign (€), press the "save" button, and view the text using using the web application, I found the euro sign was corrupted into "?".

I am trying to find whether the text is corrupted in the database.

  1. Is the euro sign stored as "0xE2 0x82 0xAC" (3 bytes) in Oracle?

  2. If this is the case, is there a database query which can confirm this? (Lets say that the table is called SOME_TABLE and the CLOB field is called SOME_FIELD.)

Thank you very much.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

It's stored the same way as a varchar2, and does appear to be 3 bytes. You can use the dump function to see how it's stored, though with a clob you'll need to extract the relevant characters (3-bytes worth in this case), e.g. with dbms_lob.substr. This is from 11gR2 on Linux:

create table t42 (x clob, y varchar2(10));

insert into t42(x, y) values ('€','€');

select dump(dbms_lob.substr(x,3,1)) from t42;

DUMP(DBMS_LOB.SUBSTR(X,3,1))
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Typ=1 Len=6: 195,162,194,130,194,172

select dump(y) from t42;

DUMP(Y)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Typ=1 Len=6: 195,162,194,130,194,172

Or in hex:

select dump(dbms_lob.substr(x,3,1),16) from t42;

DUMP(DBMS_LOB.SUBSTR(X,3,1),16)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Typ=1 Len=6: c3,a2,c2,82,c2,ac
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.