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I am getting confused with the scenario of 2 classes implementing the same interface and Dependency Injection.

public interface ISomething
{
  void DoSomething();
}

public class SomethingA : ISomething
{
  public void DoSomething()
  {

  }
}

public class SomethingAB : ISomething
{
  public void DoSomething()
  {

  }
}

public class Different
{
  private ISomething ThisSomething;

  public Different(ISomething Something)
  {  
    ThisSomething = Something;
  }
}

I have seen online examples say that this is valid but you would only use one class at a time. So if the app is running at SiteA you tell your IOC to use SomethingA but if its at SiteB you tell it to use SomethingAB.

Is it considered bad practice therefore to have one app that has 2 classes that implement 1 interface and for it to try to use both classes? If its not how do you tell the IOC which class to use in the relevant circumstance?

UPDATE: To explain it better I will use Ninject's example:

public class Samurai 
{
    private IWeapon Weapon;

    public Samurai(IWeapon weapon) 
    {
        this.Weapon = weapon;
    }
}

public class Sword : IWeapon
{
...
}

public class Gun : IWeapon
{
...
}

public class WarriorModule : NinjectModule
{
    public override void Load() 
    {
        this.Bind<IWeapon>().To<Sword>();
        this.Bind<IWeapon>().To<Gun>();  //Just an example
    }
}

So now you have 2 classes that use IWeapon. Depending on something or a context in your app you want Samurai to have a Sword sometimes or a Gun at other points. How do you make this happen? How do you handle that "if" scenario??

share|improve this question
    
Personally wouldn't consider this a bad practice at all - it is a major point of defining interfaces in the first place! As for how to get your IOC container to support this - depends very much on the IOC, all the ones I've used support it with various conditional configuration options. Add a specific IOC to get an answer to that. – David Hall Jul 4 '12 at 17:15
    
Its not really a specific IOC that the problem exists, its my understanding. I assume its not best practice to instantiate classes myself and if that was ok I assume I'd need to make my IOC globally visible to get the correct instance back which I'm not sure is best practice either. – Jon Jul 4 '12 at 17:23
    
The general "best practice" for an IOC is to only have it in one place. There are exceptions, but that is the rule of thumb. One of the exceptions though is where you need this sort of runtime configuration - say you have an event that creates a class that needs configurable dependencies, within the handler for this event (IMO) you can reference your IOC there. A globally visible IOC is a BIG anti-pattern (service locator). – David Hall Jul 4 '12 at 17:30
1  
And for a specific example, see Darin's answer :) – David Hall Jul 4 '12 at 17:30
up vote 8 down vote accepted

I don't think that this is a bad practice in the general case. There are situations where you could need different implementations of the same interface inside the same application and based on the context use one or another implementation

As far as how to configure your DI to enable this scenario, well, it will depend on your DI of course :-) Some might not support it, others might not, others might partially support it, etc..

For example with Ninject, you could have the following classes:

public interface ISomething
{
}

public class SomethingA : ISomething
{
}

public class SomethingB : ISomething
{
}

public class Foo
{
    public Foo(ISomething something)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(something);
    }
}

public class Bar
{
    public Bar(ISomething something)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(something);
    }
}

and then use named bindings when configuring the kernel:

// We create the kernel that will be used to provide instances when required
var kernel = new StandardKernel();

// Declare 2 named implementations of the same interface
kernel.Bind<ISomething>().To<SomethingA>().Named("somethingA");
kernel.Bind<ISomething>().To<SomethingB>().Named("somethingB");

// inject SomethingA into Foo's constructor
kernel.Bind<Foo>().ToSelf().WithConstructorArgument(
    "something", ctx => ctx.Kernel.Get<ISomething>("somethingA")
);

// inject SomethingB into Bar's constructor
kernel.Bind<Bar>().ToSelf().WithConstructorArgument(
    "something", ctx => ctx.Kernel.Get<ISomething>("somethingB")
);

Now when you request an instance of Foo it will inject SomethingA into it its constructor and when you request an instance of Bar it will inject SomethingB into it:

var foo = kernel.Get<Foo>();
var bar = kernel.Get<Bar>();
share|improve this answer
    
Isn't creating 2 classes that accept ISomething duplicate code unnecessarily? Also all of this is done at the start of the program but this may be just be a learning curve thing but I assume that I will no longer be instantiating classes in my code?? – Jon Jul 4 '12 at 17:48
    
I don't see why this would be duplicate code. You could have 2 classes that require the same contract (ISomething) and the consumer of those classes decide that he needs to inject different implementations depending on the context. – Darin Dimitrov Jul 4 '12 at 17:50
    
Also I won't be requesting an instance of Foo or Bar in my application because I would need to make the kernel globally visible?? – Jon Jul 4 '12 at 17:51
2  
No, you never do that. The kernel should be absolutely transparent. You should never directly use it in your consumer code. For example in ASP.NET MVC you could use a custom DependencyResolver with NInject (Ninject.MVC3 NuGet) which will simply inject the dependencies you indicate directly into controllers. In 99% of the applications you never write code such as kernel.Get<Something>(). You never need to access the kernel. You configure it once for the lifetime of the application and leave it do its job. – Darin Dimitrov Jul 4 '12 at 17:53
    
See updated question. I still don't see in your example why you'd have 2 classes instead of keeping the original 1 class – Jon Jul 4 '12 at 19:22

i worked with Unity and spring in this context and i think that interest lies in having a weak coupling between packages, ie classes, the ability to change service or point of entry is a consequence of the ioc.

ioc provides flexibility in the use of service, or from the time the services implement the same interface,

If Utilize Service A Service B and Service is in the service package A and package B is in B. Package A has no reference on the package b, but the service A has a reference on the package containing the interfaces. Therefore we conclude that we have a weak coupling between package A and package b.

share|improve this answer

Having multiple implementations mapped to the same interface isn't really bad practice, but it isn't he most common usage pattern.

You didn't specify a specific DI tool, but if you use Unity, you can do this with named instances. See here: Unity - how to use multiple mappings for the same type and inject into an object

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