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When AutoMapper encounters an object that's already been mapped, it seems to use that object again, instead of trying to re-map it. I believe it does this based on .Equals().

I have a tree that's being mapped. So, a node with some properties, and children. More than one of the nodes have the same value of .Equals(), because it's based off an Id property. The children of the nodes are different and I need those re-mapped, but it's using a cached map value.

Is there a way to turn the cached mapping off? All I can think of is implementing a new converter, but that totally defeats the purpose of using AutoMapper.

Here is an example on how to reproduce.

void Main()
{
    var source = new List<Tag>
    {
        new Tag 
        { 
            Id = 1, 
            Name = "Tag 1", 
            ChildTags = new List<Tag>
            {
                new Tag 
                { 
                    Id = 2, 
                    Name = "Tag 2", 
                    ChildTags = new List<Tag> 
                    {
                        new Tag {Id = 3, Name = "Tag 3"},
                        new Tag {Id = 4, Name = "Tag 4"}
                    }
                }
            }
        },
        new Tag { Id = 1, Name = "Tag 1" },
        new Tag 
        {
            Id = 3, Name = "Tag 3", ChildTags = new List<Tag>
            {
                new Tag {Id = 4, Name = "Tag 4"}
            }
        }
    };

    Mapper.CreateMap<Tag, Tag>();
    var results = Mapper.Map<IList<Tag>, IList<Tag>>(source);

    results.Dump();
}

public class Tag
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<Tag> ChildTags { get; set; }

    public override bool Equals(Object obj)
    {
        if (obj == null)
        {
            return false;
        }

        var x = this;
        var y = (Tag)obj;

        return x.Id.Equals(y.Id);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return Id.GetHashCode();
    }
}
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Found only one reference about this: groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!topic/automapper-users/…. –  Marcel N. Jul 4 '12 at 18:17
    
I will try instantiating the MappingEngine myself and controlling the lifecycle like that says and see if that will do that trick. –  Josh Close Jul 4 '12 at 18:25
    
So, looks like I would need to implement an ITypeMapFactory. This is too much work for what I need to do. If there was an easy way to turn it it off, that would be nice, but doesn't look like that's the case. If you want to create an answer to this question and put an example in, I'll mark it as an answer for you. –  Josh Close Jul 4 '12 at 19:49
2  
When you say "encounters an object that's already been mapped", are you referring to the mapping configuration (Mapper.CreateMap) or the actual mapping (Mapper.Map)? Automapper doesn't cache previously mapped instances (i.e. Mapper.Map call results are NOT cached). –  Patrick Steele Jul 6 '12 at 16:58
2  
Would there be any value to changing "Equals" to NOT have items with the same id be treated as the same object? (ie. if the rest of your code doesn't depend on it working a certain way, seems like it would fix it?) –  emragins Aug 23 '12 at 16:03

5 Answers 5

I've faced the same issue with the mapper, looking around i found that a solution for it, by adding

Mapper.Reset();

Source blog

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Thank you, been driving me mad this! –  Wilky Jul 23 '14 at 7:35
    
This doesn't work in a tree scenario though. If you look at Saan's example and override GetHashCode, you can see it happen. I'm not sure where you could inject Mapper.Reset() in there. –  Josh Close Mar 23 at 15:06
    
the reset should be done before and after as the call. –  OQX Mar 24 at 20:39

I also get the same issue. It doesn't happen when you map the same object twice - it happens when you have a tree heirarcy of objects, and the same value exists in two places of the tree (but with different child values) When mapping the second instance of the item - it uses the child values of the first instance, instead of re-evaluating what the child values should be.

Here is my example:

class Tag { 
  int Id {get; set;}
  string Name {get; set;}
  IEnumerable<Tag> ChildTags  {get; set;}
}

public void Test()
{
var source =  new List<Tag>
            {
                new Tag { Id = 1, Name = "Tag 1", ChildTags = new List<Tag>
                            {
                                new Tag { Id = 2, Name = "Tag 2", ChildTags = new List<Tag> 
                                            {
                                                new Tag {Id = 3, Name = "Tag 3"},
                                                new Tag {Id = 4, Name = "Tag 4"}
                                            }
                                    }
                            }
                    },
                new Tag { Id = 1, Name = "Tag 1" },
                new Tag {
                        Id = 3, Name = "Tag 3", ChildTags = new List<Tag>
                            {
                                new Tag {Id = 4, Name = "Tag 4"}
                            }
                    }
            };

Mapper.CreateMap<Tag, Tag>()
    .ForMember(dest => dest.ChildTags,
        opt => opt.MapFrom(src => src.ChildTags));
var result = Mapper.Map<IList<Tag>, IList<Tag>>(tags);
}

In the result

  • the first instance of Tag 1 (ie source[0]) and all of its children are perfect

  • the second instance of Tag 1 (ie source[1]) has all the children of the first instance - it should not have any children

  • the second instance of Tag 3 (ie source[2]) does not have any children - it should have Tag 4 as a child

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When AutoMapper encounters an object that's already been mapped, it seems to use that object again, instead of trying to re-map it. I believe it does this based on .Equals()

Can you explain why and when you see that ?

After a quick look in the source code, I'm sure there is no cache for objects. Here is a test that illustrate this :

   public class CustomerSource
    {
        public string FirstName { get; set; }
        public string LastName { get; set; }
        public DateTime DateOfBirth { get; set; }

        public int NumberOfOrders { get; set; }
    }

    public class CustomerTarget
    {
        public string FirstName { get; set; }
        public string LastName { get; set; }
        public DateTime DateOfBirth { get; set; }

        public int NumberOfOrders { get; set; }
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void Test_AutoMapper()
    {
        Mapper.CreateMap<CustomerSource, CustomerTarget>();

        var source = new CustomerSource() { DateOfBirth = DateTime.Now, FirstName = "FirstName", LastName = "LastName", NumberOfOrders = int.MaxValue };

        var res1 = Mapper.Map<CustomerSource, CustomerTarget>(source);
        Console.WriteLine(res1.FirstName); // PRINT FirstName

        source.FirstName += "[UPDATED]";
        source.LastName += "[UPDATED]";

        var res2 = Mapper.Map<CustomerSource, CustomerTarget>(source);
        Console.WriteLine(res1.FirstName); // PRINT FirstName[UPDATED]

    }

Without your code, it is difficult to go more deeply. There is also a method Mapper.Reset() that clears the MapperEngine and the MapingConfiguration (all internal mapping expressions will be lost)

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Saan's "answer" has code. –  Josh Close Sep 28 '12 at 23:51
    
so, accept his answer –  Cybermaxs Oct 1 '12 at 11:21
    
Sorry, I was saying his answer has code showing the reproduction of the issue. I said "answer" in quotes because it wasn't an answer, but a comment. –  Josh Close Mar 23 at 14:43
    
Also, the library creator said it is cached. groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!topic/automapper-users/… It's been a few years now, maybe this is something that has been "fixed". –  Josh Close Mar 23 at 14:45

It seems that the Equals behaviour of the tree object you're mapping is inappropriate.

The method should only return true if "the specified object is equal to the current object." - http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bsc2ak47.aspx

In your case, you have two tree objects sharing the same id but clearly, they are not "equal" since they have different children.

I suggest looking at why the Equals method has been abused in this way and whether you could get the behaviour you need by not overriding the Equals method, instead using a different method to check the tree id field with a more appropriate name eg. TreeIdsAreEqual.

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What makes an object equal? In a database, it's the primary key. This means all the other fields could be different, even though we know it's representing the same thing. –  Josh Close Mar 23 at 14:41
up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is now an option to disable the cache.

Mapper.CreateMap<Tag, Tag>();
var results = Mapper.Map<IList<Tag>, IList<Tag>>(source, opt => opt.DisableCache = true);
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