Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In this code sample, is there any way to continue on the outer loop from the catch block?

while
{
   // outer loop

   while
   {
       // inner loop
       try
       {
           throw;
       }
       catch 
       {
           // how do I continue on the outer loop from here?
           continue;
       }
   }
}
share|improve this question
13  
Nested loops only lead to despair. –  Michael Meadows Jul 15 '09 at 19:51

10 Answers 10

up vote 61 down vote accepted

UPDATE: This question was inspiration for my article on this subject. Thanks for the great question!


"continue" and "break" are nothing more than a pleasant syntax for a "goto". Apparently by giving them cute names and restricting their usages to particular control structures, they no longer draw the ire of the "all gotos are all bad all the time" crowd.

If what you want to do is a continue-to-outer, you could simply define a label at the top of the outer loop and then "goto" that label. If you felt that doing so did not impede the comprehensibility of the code, then that might be the most expedient solution.

However, I would take this as an opportunity to consider whether your control flow would benefit from some refactoring. Whenever I have conditional "break" and "continue" in nested loops, I consider refactoring.

Consider:

successfulCandidate = null;
foreach(var candidate in candidates)
{
  foreach(var criterion in criteria)
  {
    if (!candidate.Meets(criterion)) // Edited.
    {  // TODO: no point in continuing checking criteria.
       // TODO: Somehow "continue" outer loop to check next candidate
    }
  }
  successfulCandidate = candidate;
  break;
}
if (successfulCandidate != null) // do something

Two refactoring techniques:

First, extract the inner loop to a method:

foreach(var candidate in candidates)
{
  if (MeetsCriteria(candidate, criteria))
  { 
      successfulCandidate = candidate;
      break;
  }
}

Second, can all the loops be eliminated? If you are looping because you are trying to search for something, then refactor it into a query.

var results = from candidate in candidates 
              where criteria.All(criterion=>candidate.Meets(criterion))
              select candidate;
var successfulCandidate = results.FirstOrDefault();
if (successfulCandidate != null)
{
  do something with the candidate
}

If there are no loops then there is no need to break or continue!

share|improve this answer
3  
+1 Well said... –  Andrew Hare Jul 15 '09 at 19:41
4  
+1 for "...extract the inner loop to a method." I require lot of justification in code reviews when I see nested loops. They usually hurt readability, maintainability, and stability. OP's question can be solved with a simple "return" or "throw" (thereby not relying on gotos in any way). –  Michael Meadows Jul 15 '09 at 19:50
1  
props for the refactoring comment. –  ryansstack Jul 15 '09 at 19:52
5  
Absolutely. When you think you need a goto, first stop for a moment and ponder if you really do. If you still need a goto, then just use it - it's in the language for a reason. It's not inherently evil either - it just commonly appears in evil patterns, and therefore should serve as a signal to stop and try to spot such patterns (and not to plunge into "OMG goto this is all wrong" panic). –  Pavel Minaev Jul 16 '09 at 0:35
2  
Don't forget to add using System.Linq for the second refactoring technique. –  Matt Jun 30 '11 at 18:27

You can use a break; statement.

while
{
   while
   {
       try
       {
           throw;
       }
       catch 
       {
           break;
       }
   }
}

Continue is used to jump back to the top of the current loop.

If you need to break out more levels than that you will either have to add some kind of 'if' or use the dreaded/not recommended 'goto'.

share|improve this answer
1  
The problem with this method is if there is extra work that needs to be done between the end of the inner loop and the end of the outer loop, it will be done when calling break, but wouldn't be done when calling continue. You'd need a flag if you need that code to not be executed. I'm not saying that this answer is wrong (heck, I upvoted it), I'm saying that it's deceptively simple. –  Welbog Jul 15 '09 at 19:31
    while
    {
       // outer loop

       while
       {
           // inner loop
           try
           {
               throw;
           }
           catch 
           {
               // how do I continue on the outer loop from here?
               goto REPEAT;
           }
       }
       // end of outer loop
REPEAT:
    }

Problem solved. (what?? Why are you all giving me that dirty look?)

share|improve this answer

Swap the try/catch structure with the inner while loop:

while {
  try {
    while {
      throw;
    }
  }
  catch {
    continue;
  }
}
share|improve this answer

No.
I suggest, extracting the inner loop into a separate method.

while
{
   // outer loop
       try
       {
           myMethodWithWhileLoopThatThrowsException()
       }
       catch 
       {
           // how do I continue on the outer loop from here?
           continue;
       }
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is problematic because the separate metod will not have access to existing local variables. –  zvrba Jul 15 '09 at 19:34
2  
That's why Microsoft gave us function parameters. –  Welbog Jul 15 '09 at 19:36
    
pass the variables as parameters, or if side-effects are necessary, send it through as an anonymous delegate to be executed in the method. Then the compiler will create a closure, preserving your local scope. –  Michael Meadows Jul 15 '09 at 19:54
1  
You also should not be using the exception handling process for normal code control flow –  Brian Leeming Oct 14 '11 at 18:18

Use break in the inner loop.

share|improve this answer

You just want to break from the inner which would continue the outer.

while
{
   // outer loop

   while
   {
       // inner loop
       try
       {
           throw;
       }
       catch 
       {
           // how do I continue on the outer loop from here?
           break;
       }
   }
}
share|improve this answer

I think the best way to accomplish this would be to use the break statement. Break ends the current loop and continues execution from where it ends. In this case, it would end the inner loop and jump back into the outer while loop. This is what your code would look like:

while
{
   // outer loop

   while
   {
       // inner loop
       try
       {
           throw;
       }
       catch 
       {
           // break jumps to outer loop, ends inner loop immediately.
           break; //THIS IS THE BREAK
       }
   }
}

I believe that is what you were looking to be accomplished, correct? Thanks!

share|improve this answer
using System;

namespace Examples
{

    public class Continue : Exception { }
    public class Break : Exception { }

    public class NestedLoop
    {
        static public void ContinueOnParentLoopLevel()
        {
            while(true)
            try {
               // outer loop

               while(true)
               {
                   // inner loop

                   try
                   {
                       throw new Exception("Bali mu mamata");
                   }
                   catch (Exception)
                   {
                       // how do I continue on the outer loop from here?

                       throw new Continue();
                   }
               }
            } catch (Continue) {
                   continue;
            }
        } 
    }

}

}
share|improve this answer

Use an own exception type, e.g., MyException. Then:

while
{
   try {
   // outer loop
   while
   {
       // inner loop
       try
       {
           throw;
       }
       catch 
       {
           // how do I continue on the outer loop from here?
           throw MyException;
       }
   }
   } catch(MyException)
   { ; }
}

This will work for continuing and breaking out of several levels of nested while statements. Sorry for bad formatting ;)

share|improve this answer
4  
You hurt my feelings, using exceptions for no other purpose than flow control. No downvote, just hurt feelings. :( –  Michael Meadows Jul 15 '09 at 20:05
3  
This makes me want to vomit everywhere –  John Rasch Jul 15 '09 at 20:26
2  
That's a little more emphatic than "hurt my feelings." –  Michael Meadows Jul 15 '09 at 21:35
1  
how dare you...... –  Justin Kirk Oct 15 '12 at 12:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.