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Today I had an interview there they asked me can we include .c file to a source file? I said yes. Because few years back I saw the same in some project where they have include .c file. But just now I was trying the same.

abc.c

#include<stdio.h>
void abc()
{ printf("From ABC() \n"); }


main.c

#include<stdio.h>
#include "abc.c"
int main()
{   void abc();
    return 0;
}

Getting an error:

D:\Embedded\...\abc.c :- multiple definition of 'abc'

Where is it going wrong?

I wrote an abc.h file (the body of abc.h is { extern void abc(void); }), and included the file in abc.c (commenting out #include abc.c). Worked fine.

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("Worked fine" with warnings enabled?) –  user166390 Jul 4 '12 at 19:16
3  
Well, there are multiple definitions of abc, just as the compiler says –  David Heffernan Jul 4 '12 at 19:16
    
Done it a lot of time, being lazy to write a makefile or atleast a script to compiler multi-file codes (when not using an IDE). When including the .c file just visualize that the entire contents of that file will be at that position, and visualizing that you need to adjust the re-definitions. –  phoxis Jul 5 '12 at 12:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Do it as follows:

abc.c:

#include <stdio.h>
void abc()
{printf("From ABC() \n");}

main.c:

#include<stdio.h>
#include "abc.c"
int main()
{   
    abc();
    return 0;
}

(no need for the header file)

Then, to compile, you'd only compile main.c. Do not attempt to compile both abc.c and main.c, because then you'd have the abc() function defined twice.

You need to understand that #include is basically "copy-paste", nothing more. If you tell it #include "abc.c", it will simply take the contents of abc.c, and "paste" them in your main.c file. Therefore, using the above for main.c, after the preprocessor processes it, your main.c will look like this (I'm ignoring the #include <stdio.h>s):

#include<stdio.h>
#include <stdio.h>
void abc()
{printf("From ABC() \n");}
int main()
{   
    abc();
    return 0;
}

which is a valid program.

That said you should generally not do this; you should compile all your .c files separately and only then link them together.

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2  
The prototype is not the issue. That won't cause a multiple definition error. –  ThiefMaster Jul 4 '12 at 19:18
    
@houbysoft: I did the same but still the error is there. No improvement –  Rasmi Ranjan Nayak Jul 4 '12 at 19:20
    
I second @ThiefMaster. Doing the above should still result in an error, as void abc() is defined in two translation units: abc.c and main.c (via the include). The linker should still complain. –  eran Jul 4 '12 at 19:21
    
@ThiefMaster: whoops. Forgot to mention that he should only compile main.c, edited. –  houbysoft Jul 4 '12 at 19:21
1  
@RasmiRanjanNayak: huh? Then there's a problem with your anti-virus :) –  houbysoft Jul 4 '12 at 19:27

Including C files is perfectly valid as long as you do not try to compile the included C file by itself and then link it together with the object file from the C file which included the other file.

If you do so you'll have the same symbol (usually a function) defined in two files which will result in the errors you posted.

If you have multiple source files you usually do not include them but compile them separately. The linker then merges the object files into a single executable (or library).

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You can include file with any extension.

In your program, you had re-defined void abc(); in main (). instead just put statement abc ();

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From the research that I have made, this is the clearest and the simplest answer to the question. Vote up! –  ChinoCarloSedilla Jul 10 '12 at 8:06

You can include anything you like to, the preprocessor doesn't care about the file extensions. It's only some tradition to name the headers ".h" and the source files ".c" or ".cpp".

You only have to be sure, that after compiling the whole project you don't run into linker problems (e.g. giving both "abc.c" and "main.c" to the compiler would result in mutliple definitions of your function).

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Thanks A lot.... –  Rasmi Ranjan Nayak Jul 5 '12 at 6:48

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