Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to search a (non-text) file for the byte sequence "9µ}Æ" (or "\x39\xb5\x7d\xc6").

After 5 hours of searching online this is the best I could do. It works but I wanted to know if there is a better way:

char buffer;

int pos=in.tellg();

// search file for string
while(!in.eof()){
    in.read(&buffer, 1);
    pos=in.tellg();
    if(buffer=='9'){
        in.read(&buffer, 1);
        pos=in.tellg();
        if(buffer=='µ'){
            in.read(&buffer, 1);
            pos=in.tellg();
            if(buffer=='}'){
                in.read(&buffer, 1);
                pos=in.tellg();
                if(buffer=='Æ'){
                    cout << "found";
                }
            }
        }
    }

    in.seekg((streampos) pos);

Note:

  • I can't use getline(). It's not a text file so there are probably not many line breaks.
  • Before I tried using a multi-character buffer and then copying the buffer to a C++ string, and then using string::find(). This didn't work because there are many '\0' characters throughout the file, so the sequence in the buffer would be cut very short when it was copied to the string.
share|improve this question
    
why aren't you reading in 4 chars at a time instead of 1? –  twain249 Jul 4 '12 at 19:52
    
You could read a big chunk of bytes at once, store them in an array of bytes, and compare them using memcmp or std::search. Repeat until EOF, if you wish. –  jweyrich Jul 4 '12 at 19:53
    
Are you in a system where you can spawn a grep process? –  Almo Jul 4 '12 at 19:53
1  
..or 32K at a time? reading 4 characters is not quite as bad as reading one, but it's getting there.. –  Martin James Jul 4 '12 at 19:54
2  
@jweyrich Note that in that method you'd need to add some extra logic to detect the case where the byte-sequence spans the border between the end of one chunk and the start of the next... –  Jeremy Friesner Jul 4 '12 at 20:00

5 Answers 5

Because you said you cannot search the entire file because of null terminator characters in the string, here's an alternative for you, which reads the entire file in and uses recursion to find the first occurrence of a string inside of the whole file.

    #include <iostream>
    #include <fstream>
    #include <string>

    using namespace std;

    string readFile (char *fileName) {
      ifstream fi (fileName);
      if (!fi)
        cerr << "ERROR: Cannot open file" << endl;
      else {
        string str ((istreambuf_iterator<char>(fi)), istreambuf_iterator<char>());
        return str;
      }
      return NULL;
    }

    bool findFirstOccurrenceOf_r (string haystack, char *needle, int haystack_pos, int needle_pos, int needle_len) {
      if (needle_pos == needle_len)
        return true;
      if (haystack[haystack_pos] == needle[needle_pos]) 
        return findFirstOccurrenceOf_r (haystack, needle, haystack_pos+1, needle_pos+1, needle_len);
      return false;
    }

    int findFirstOccurrenceOf (string haystack, char *needle, int length) {
      int pos = -1;
      for (int i = 0; i < haystack.length() - length; i++) {
        if (findFirstOccurrenceOf_r (haystack, needle, i, 0, length))
          return i;
      }
      return pos;
    }

    int main () {
      char str_to_find[4] = {0x39, 0xB5, 0x7D, 0xC6};
      string contents = readFile ("input");

      int pos = findFirstOccurrenceOf (contents, str_to_find, 4);

      cout << pos << endl;
    }

If the file is not too large, your best solution would be to load the whole file into memory, so you don't need to keep reading from the drive. If the file is too large to load in at once, you would want to load in chunks of the file at a time. But if you do load in chucks, make sure you check to edges of the chunks. It's possible that your chunk happens to split right in the middle of the string you're searching for.

share|improve this answer
const char delims[] = { 0x39, 0xb5, 0x7d, 0xc6 };
char buffer[4];
const size_t delim_size = 4;
const size_t last_index = delim_size - 1;

for ( size_t i = 0; i < last_index; ++i )
{
  if ( ! ( is.get( buffer[i] ) ) )
    return false; // stream to short
}

while ( is.get(buffer[last_index]) )
{
  if ( memcmp( buffer, delims, delim_size ) == 0 )
    break; // you are arrived
  memmove( buffer, buffer + 1, last_index );
}

You are looking for 4 bytes:

unsigned int delim = 0xc67db539;
unsigned int uibuffer;
char * buffer = reinterpret_cast<char *>(&uibuffer);

for ( size_t i = 0; i < 3; ++i )
{
  if ( ! ( is.get( buffer[i] ) ) )
    return false; // stream to short
}

while ( is.get(buffer[3]) )
{
  if ( uibuffer == delim )
    break; // you are arrived
  uibuffer >>= 8;
}
share|improve this answer

Similar to what bames53 posted; I used a vector as a buffer:

std::ifstream ifs("file.bin");

ifs.seekg(0, std::ios::end);
std::streamsize f_size = ifs.tellg();
ifs.seekg(0, std::ios::beg);

std::vector<unsigned char> buffer(f_size);
ifs.read(buffer.data(), f_size);

std::vector<unsigned char> seq = {0x39, 0xb5, 0x7d, 0xc6};

bool found = std::search(buffer.begin(), buffer.end(), seq.begin(), seq.end()) != buffer.end();
share|improve this answer

This program loads the entire file into memory and then uses std::search on it.

int main() {
    std::string filedata;
    {
        std::ifstream fin("file.dat");
        std::stringstream ss;
        ss << fin.rdbuf();
        filedata = ss.str();
    }

    std::string key = "\x39\xb5\x7d\xc6";
    auto result = std::search(std::begin(filedata), std::end(filedata),
                              std::begin(key), std::end(key));
    if (std::end(filedata) != result) {
        std::cout << "found\n";
        // result is an iterator pointing at '\x39'
    }
}
share|improve this answer

If you don't mind loading the entire file into an in-memory array (or using mmap() to make it look like the file is in memory), you could then search for your character sequence in-memory, which is a bit easier to do:

// Works much like strstr(), except it looks for a binary sub-sequence rather than a string sub-sequence
const char * MemMem(const char * lookIn, int numLookInBytes, const char * lookFor, int numLookForBytes)
{
        if (numLookForBytes == 0)              return lookIn;  // hmm, existential questions here
   else if (numLookForBytes == numLookInBytes) return (memcmp(lookIn, lookFor, numLookInBytes) == 0) ? lookIn : NULL;
   else if (numLookForBytes < numLookInBytes)
   {
      const char * startedAt = lookIn;
      int matchCount = 0;
      for (int i=0; i<numLookInBytes; i++)
      {
         if (lookIn[i] == lookFor[matchCount])
         {
            if (matchCount == 0) startedAt = &lookIn[i];
            if (++matchCount == numLookForBytes) return startedAt;
         }
         else matchCount = 0;
      }
   }
   return NULL;
}

.... then you can just call the above function on the in-memory data array:

char * ret = MemMem(theInMemoryArrayContainingFilesBytes, numBytesInFile, myShortSequence, 4);
if (ret != NULL) printf("Found it at offset %i\n", ret-theInMemoryArrayContainingFilesBytes);
            else printf("It's not there.\n");
share|improve this answer
2  
If you're going to load the file into memory anyway, why not just use std::search? –  bames53 Jul 4 '12 at 20:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.