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I am making some game and I get following error :

class Apple:public Fruit{
public:
    bool isAppleOK = false;
Apple(int amount, int pHValue) {
    amount = amount;
    pHValue= pHValue;
} ~Apple() {
}
    /*code trimmed*/

error C2864: 'Apple::isAppleOK ' : only static const integral data members can be initialized within a class

What am I missing here?

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3  
Note that, and Luchien hinted at this, the syntax you used is perfectly valid in C++11. It just fills in for whenever an initialization of isAppleOK is required. Just something to keep in mind. See this section of Bjarne's C++11 FAQ for more details. –  chris Jul 4 '12 at 21:57
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3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

This is not the way you initialize member variables in C++. You need to set the value in the init list of the constructor:

Apple(int amount, int pHValue) : isAppleOK(false) {
    amount = amount;
    pHValue= pHValue;
}

You can also move the initialization of your other variables into the initialization list:

Apple(int amt, int pHv)
:   isAppleOK(false)
,   amount(amt)
,   pHValue(pHv) {
}
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OK, I am new to c++, does that mean that is the way to initalize member variables for inherited classes? –  Takarakaka Jul 4 '12 at 21:57
1  
@Takarakaka, You should always initialize your class members like this. They get initialized before the body anyway, so you might as well be the one to do it. Try having a class with a constant member and see if you can initialize it without the list (making it static doesn't count). –  chris Jul 4 '12 at 21:59
    
Thank you for this and the one about doing it in c++11 explaination, @chris –  Takarakaka Jul 4 '12 at 22:00
2  
@Takarakaka When you inherit from a class, you should rely on the constructor of the base class to do initialization of its members. If it is necessary to pass arguments to the constructor of the base class in order for it to complete initialization, you should pass them in the initialization list as well. For example, if you inherit class A : public B, then you can do this: A::A(int arg) : B(arg), isValid(true) {}. –  dasblinkenlight Jul 4 '12 at 22:02
    
Thank you for the hints! @dasblinkenlight –  Takarakaka Jul 4 '12 at 22:10
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What am I missing here?

You're missing this:

only static const integral data members can be initialized within a class

Is isAppleOk a static const intergral member of Apple? No, it's not. Initialize it in your constructor's initialization list.

class Apple {
public:
    Apple() : isAppleOk(false) { }
private:
    bool isAppleOk;
}
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You cannot initialize a variable inside declaration.

class Apple: public Fruit{
public:
    bool isAppleOK;
    Apple(int amount, int pHValue) : amount(amount), pHValue(pHValue),
                                     isAppleOK(false)
    {
    } 

    ~Apple() {
    }
};

It is not totally related, but also use initialization list, because your compiler maybe will translate:

class Apple:public Fruit{
public:
    bool isAppleOK;
    Apple(int amount, int pHValue) {
    amount = amount;
    pHValue= pHValue;
    } 
    ~Apple() {
    }
};

To

class Apple:public Fruit{
    public:
        bool isAppleOK;
        Apple(int amount, int pHValue): amount(), phValue(), 
                                        isAppleOk() {
        amount = amount;
        pHValue= pHValue;
        } 
        ~Apple() {
        }
    };

If you have complex types as parameters in your constructor maybe will occur some overhead in each object construction, because first the class member will be initialized, after that it will be assign to a new value.

With initialization lists this will be done at the same time without the possible overhead.

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