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class Parser():
        html_escape_table = {
            "&": "&",
            '"': """,
            "'": "'",
            ">": ">",
            "<": "&lt;",
            }
        def html_escape(text):
            return "".join(html_escape_table.get(c,c) for c in text)
        def query():
            database = [x, y, z, etc, etc2]
            for x in database:
                html_escape(x)
                print x #for testing purposes
                return
test = Parser()

test.query()

Am I doing this correctly? I keep getting an error:

TypeError: query() takes no arguments (1 given)

I'm not seeing anywhere where I am passing an argument to query, or even to Parser.

Can someone explain what I am doing wrong here?

I tried calling just Parser.query() and got this error (this was after adding the self argument to all of my functions and object argument to my Parser class)

    Parser.query()
TypeError: unbound method query() must be called with Parser instance as first argument (got nothing instead)
share|improve this question
1  
A class always passes a reference to itself as the first argument. change query()'s definition to def query(self): –  Joel Cornett Jul 5 '12 at 0:27
    
You should read the Python tutorial, which explains all this. –  BrenBarn Jul 5 '12 at 0:36
1  
Wait, if query doesn't use anything within a Parser object, then why are you writing it as a method of Parser? Why not keep it as a function in the same file outside the class? –  inspectorG4dget Jul 5 '12 at 0:39

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Methods in classes require the argument self this is to do with parsing the instance to the method in how python does instance methods.

e.g.

class Test(object):
    def say_hello(self):
        print "Hi there"

Just to expand on this if you want to parse arguments to an instance method you still need self

class Test(object):
    def say_hello(self, name):
        print "Hi %s" % name

Edit:

Okay to explain it further you have to know how python handles instances, python handles instances in a very verbose and clear way, self is always used to refer to itself or this current instance, just like this in Java. So when python calls my_instance.method() its actually calling TheObject.method(my_instance) hence why self refers to the my_instance inside the method. That allows you to use the instance inside the method with the instance itself passed around inside the arugments.

Edit 2:

Even when you have self as an argument to the methods you need to call it from an instance like so

my_parser = Parser()
my_parser.method()

Edit 3:

This isn't Java you don't have to bind your functions together as methods inside a class, just leave them as free-roaming functions inside a parser.py file then you can do

import parser
parser.do_this()
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1  
Can you explain this concept further? I don't entirely understand it. Basically I'm calling an instance of the method, and I have to use self to refer to the instance of the method, as opposed to the actual method? –  Andrew Alexander Jul 5 '12 at 0:30
    
@AndrewAlexander Tried to explain it better –  Jakob Bowyer Jul 5 '12 at 0:34

With Python, class methods must have their first parameter be self

class Parser(): # Creates a class that contain all of the functions that parse the mood based on tweets
    html_escape_table = {
            "&": "&amp;",
            '"': "&quot;",
            "'": "&apos;",
            ">": "&gt;",
            "<": "&lt;",
    }
    def html_escape(self, text):
        return "".join(html_escape_table.get(c,c) for c in text)
    def query(self):
        database = [x, y, z, etc, etc2]
        for x in database:
            html_escape(x)
            print x #for testing purposes
            return

test = Parser()

test.query()
share|improve this answer
2  
Your post is broken. –  Jakob Bowyer Jul 5 '12 at 0:27
    
Oh really? I was fixing it... –  C0deH4cker Jul 5 '12 at 0:28
1  
Don't forget to edit the parameters to all the methods. –  Joel Cornett Jul 5 '12 at 0:28
    
Oops, forgot one lol –  C0deH4cker Jul 5 '12 at 0:29

One small thing: If you start using classes in Python (at least in Python 2.x, Python 3 is different), you might want to use new style classes, which inherit from object.

Python 2.x classes, new style:

class MyClass(object):
    def __init__(self, args):
        # some code here

    # more methods here

The old style classes (without the object) should not be used anymore in current versions in Python 2.

If you are working with Python 3, it's different. Classes are one of the concepts that have had a cleanup in Python 3, so there is no need to inherit from object anymore. So if you are learning to use classes in Python, make sure the instructions you get are for the correct version (mainly 2 vs 3 that is).

share|improve this answer
1  
Unless your in Python3 then object is intrinsic –  Jakob Bowyer Jul 5 '12 at 0:34
    
@JakobBowyer I thought I wrote that... kind of.. –  kratenko Jul 5 '12 at 0:35
    
Well its not clear enough in your post –  Jakob Bowyer Jul 5 '12 at 0:36
    
@JakobBowyer Okay, guess you are right. I changed it, now it should stand out. Thanks for the advise. –  kratenko Jul 5 '12 at 0:42
    
OP was clearly not using Python 3. –  Wooble Jul 5 '12 at 2:31

In any object-oriented language, methods have to have a way to access the object on which they were called. In some languages, this is done implicitly. In Python, methods have to be declared with an explicit first self parameter.

Here I've fixed your code to have the self parameters.

class Parser():
    """A class that contain all of the functions that parse the mood based on tweets."""
    html_escape_table = {
        "&": "&amp;",
        '"': "&quot;",
        "'": "&apos;",
        ">": "&gt;",
        "<": "&lt;",
        }
    def html_escape(self, text):
        return "".join(self.html_escape_table.get(c,c) for c in text)

    def query(self):
        database = [x, y, z, etc, etc2]
        for x in database:
            self.html_escape(x)
            print x #for testing purposes
            return

test = Parser()    
test.query()

When you call a method like test.query(), the query method is invoked, and test is passed in as the self parameter. Also, within your methods, when you want to refer to the object, you have to use the self parameter to access the attributes explicitly.

One last point: in your query() method, you return within the for loop, so you'll only execute one iteration of the loop, rather than iterating over all of database.

share|improve this answer

Ahh!

You are calling query on an object (called test) of type Parser. Under the hood, what python is doing, is calling Parser.query(test).

This is why when you write a method inside a class, you should always include self as the first parameter.

As others mention, changing your function signature to def query(self) would solve this problem

Hope that helps

share|improve this answer
    
Oh, I only want to call Parser.query() –  Andrew Alexander Jul 5 '12 at 0:35

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