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I've been developing an application that handles accounts and transactions made over these accounts.

Currently the tables the application uses are modelled the following way:

account
+----+-----------------+---------+-----+
| id | current_balance | version | ... |
+----+-----------------+---------+-----+
| 1  | 1000            | 48902   | ... |
| 2  | 2000            | 34933   | ... |
| 3  | 100             | 103     | ... |
+----+-----------------+---------+-----+

account_transaction
+------+-------------+----------------------+---------+------------------+-----+
|  id  | account_id  |          date        |  value  | resulting_amount | ... |
+------+-------------+----------------------+---------+------------------+-----+
| 101  | 1           | 03/may/2012 10:13:33 | 1000    | 2000             | ... |
| 102  | 2           | 03/may/2012 10:13:33 | 500     | 1500             | ... |
| 103  | 1           | 03/may/2012 10:13:34 | -500    | 1500             | ... |
| 104  | 2           | 03/may/2012 10:13:35 | -50     | 1450             | ... |
| 105  | 2           | 03/may/2012 10:13:35 | 550     | 2000             | ... |
| 106  | 1           | 03/may/2012 10:13:35 | -500    | 1000             | ... |
+------+-------------+----------------------+---------+------------------+-----+

Whenever the application processes a new transaction, it inserts a new row into account_transaction and, at the account table, it updates the column current_balance that store the current balance for the account and the column version used for optimistic locking. If the optimistic locking works, the transaction is commited, if it doesn't the transaction is rolled back.

As a rough example, when processing the transaction 102, the application did the following pseudo SQL/JAVA:

set autocommit = 0;

insert into account_transaction
(account_id, date, value, resulting_amount)
values
(2, sysdate(), 550, 2000);

update account set 
    current_balance = 2000, 
    version = 34933  
where 
    id = 2 and
    version = 34932;

if (ROW_COUNT() != 1) {
    rollback;
}
else {
    commit;
}

However certain accounts are very active and receive many simultaneous transactions which causes deadlocks at MySQL while updating the rows at account table. These deadlocks impose a serious performance penalty to the application since it causes the transactions to be reprocessed when deadlocks at the database occur.

How can I efficiently handle the current balance for the accounts? The current balance is needed to authorize/deny new transactions and is used in various reports.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How can I efficiently handle the current balance for the accounts?

I think this whole model is over-engineered.

Abandoning the optimistic locking through version and having a simple...

UPDATE account SET current_balance = current_balance + value WHERE id = ...

...at the end of the transaction that inserts a new account_transaction should be plenty fast. For data integrity, consider putting this into AFTER INSERT trigger on account_transaction1.

  • First of all, you are doing it at the end of the transaction, so even if the transaction is long, the lock contention on this row should be short.
  • SQL guarantees consistent data view within a single statement, so there is no need for separate SELECT ... FOR UPDATE.
  • Also, since you are adding a value, instead or directly setting the sum, it doesn't really matter in which order these operations are done - addition is commutative (so shorter transactions can "overtake" the longer ones).

1 But be careful not to trigger it too early - only insert new account_transaction when it is completely "cooked", don't (for example) insert early but update the resulting_amount later.

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sounds good, but one question: couldn't the resulting_amount field be incorrect? Say transaction X and Y both read current_balance and insert their account_transaction rows simultaneously. Although the balance would be correct after both transactions, wouldn't resulting_amount be wrong for one of the rows? –  Josh Nankin Oct 3 '12 at 18:54
    
@JoshNankin My answer focused on current_balance and it won't work so well if you need truly "serial" resulting_amount, as you noted. Try reversing the order of operations: first UPDATE the current_balance, then just copy the new balance into the new resulting_amount. InnoDB should lock the on UPDATE, effectively serializing the transactions (on the same account - other accounts can continue concurrently) and avoiding the anomaly on INSERT. This should still be plenty quick - I suggest you measure before trying to implement an optimistic locking scheme of your own. –  Branko Dimitrijevic Oct 5 '12 at 1:21

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