Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

For a custom object, I want to test two conditions. The first is whether the object is nothing. If so, enter the block. If the object is not nothing, I want to do a test on one of the object's properties, and only enter the block if it passes this test.

So the statement would by akin to:

If myObject Is Nothing Or myObject.myInt > x Then
    'Perform my task
End If

If myObject is in fact nothing, this throws an error, since when it tests the second condition, it tries to access a property of an object that isn't there.

Most languages I've worked with in the past would not bother to test the second condition of an Or statement if it found the first condition to be true, so you could get away with writing the line above. VBA doesn't seem to allow this. Is there any equivalent way i could write this statement, without resorting to:

If myObject Is Nothing Then
    'Perform my task
ElseIf myObject.myInt > x Then
    'Perform my task
End If

?

EDITED FOR CLARITY

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could create a flag:

PerformTheTask = False

If myObject Is Nothing Then
    PerformTheTask = True
ElseIf myObject.myInt > x Then
    PerformTheTask = True
End If

If PerformTheTask Then
    'Perform my task
End If
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, DJ, this is probably the most efficient way to do it, short of putting the task in a separate subroutine (which I think is overkill, it's only a few lines) – Swiftslide Jul 5 '12 at 5:07

It doesn't help you resolve your code issue, but I thought I'd include a pointer to the Wikipedia page on short-circuit operator evaluation:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Short-circuit_evaluation

It includes a useful table of common operators in common languages, classifying whether they abide by short-circuit semantics or always evaluate eagerly. In the specific base of VBA, they confirm that the operands to And and Or are indeed eagerly evaluated.

share|improve this answer
    
Glad to know it wasn't my imagination. Interesting read, that. – Swiftslide Jul 5 '12 at 5:06
    
@Swiftslide FWIW, it also comes as a surprise to me that VBA doesn't implement short-circuited And or Or... – reuben Jul 5 '12 at 5:07
    
It's funny. I always assumed that once you learn the syntax, all programming languages operated pretty much the same way. This reminds me of learning C++ and pointers, when the I knew before that was Java :/ – Swiftslide Jul 5 '12 at 5:12

While it's a little unusual, you could also do the following:

Select Case True
    Case myObject Is Nothing, myObject.myInt > x
        'Perform task
End Select

Select implicit comparisons will use short-circuit evaluation. "Or" won't.

share|improve this answer
1  
By could I mean that it's possible, not that it's necessarily a good idea :) – mkingston Jul 5 '12 at 5:34
    
Finally, the only reason it mightn't be a good idea would be if you or someone else might come back to it and find it unclear. – mkingston Jul 5 '12 at 6:23
    
That's a pretty damn good reason for never, ever doing this... Still, +1 for pointing out this quirky construct, and giving others the opportunity to reemphasize that unreadable code like this is a major pain to work with. – Jean-François Corbett Jul 5 '12 at 6:47
    
Haha, @Jean-FrançoisCorbett, I just meant to point out that there is only one reason I can see that you wouldn't use this, not that that reason isn't a good one :) – mkingston Jul 5 '12 at 12:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.