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Here is the pattern:

string str =
   "+++++tom cruise 9:44AM something text here \r\n +++++mark taylor 9:21PM";

only string that starts with +++++ and ends with AM or PM should get selected. What is Regex.split or linq query pattern?

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1  
Accept an answer or atleast drop a comment to show whether any answer is helpful to u or not –  akhil Jul 5 '12 at 5:32

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try this regex:

@"[+]{5}[^\n]+[AP]M"

var str = "+++++tom cruise 9:44AM something text here \r\n +++++mark taylor 9:21PM";
var match = Regex.Match(str, @"[+]{5}[^\n]+[AP]M").Captures[0];
match.Value.Dump(); 

Output:

+++++tom cruise 9:44AM

or:

@"[+]{5}\D+\d{1,2}:\d{1,2}[AP]M

I recommend this regex. It will match until at find a hour on format xY:xY:AM/PM where Y is opcional. Test drive:

string str = "+++++tom cruise 9:44AM something text here \r\n +++++mark taylor 9:21PM";
foreach(Match match in Regex.Matches(str, @"[+]{5}\D+\d{1,2}:\d{1,2}[AP]M"))
        Console.WriteLine(match.Value);

Output:

+++++tom cruise 9:44AM
+++++mark taylor 9:21PM
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Your "recommended" version is still greedy, and can match multiple entries at once. –  Ben Voigt Jul 5 '12 at 5:32
    
@BenVoigt: hum.. edited. –  The Mask Jul 5 '12 at 5:38

Talon almost got it, but you need a minimal capture, not greedy. Try

[+]{5}.*?(A|P)M
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2  
I golfed it down to \+{5}.*?[AP]M :) –  Blorgbeard Jul 5 '12 at 5:15
    
@Blorgbeard: Yeah, that's a tiny bit better yet. The important thing is working though. –  Ben Voigt Jul 5 '12 at 5:17
    
indeed, so I upvoted your answer instead of posting my tiny improvement :P –  Blorgbeard Jul 5 '12 at 5:18
    
@BenVoigt thats so nice... U downvoted an answer and now when corrected not even ready to take a moment to upvote it. –  akhil Jul 5 '12 at 5:30
    
@akhil: I didn't downvote your answer. Anyway, yours still has a problem with being greedy. –  Ben Voigt Jul 5 '12 at 5:31

The regex would be:

[+]{5}.*AM|[+]{5}.*PM

You can try it here: http://regexpal.com/

It's first capture was:

+++++tom cruise 9:44AM

and the second was

+++++mark taylor 9:21PM
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1  
Isn't .* greedy? Wouldn't that return the whole thing as one big match? –  Ben Voigt Jul 5 '12 at 5:10
    
@BenVoigt I'm not sure what C# Regex defaults to but I imagine there is a way to make .* not greedy. But if that's not possible, I believe replacing .* with .+? would fix the issue. –  Talon876 Jul 5 '12 at 5:13

use this:

bool bResult = false;
String strInput = @"+++++tom cruise 9:44AM something text here \r\n +++++mark taylor 9:21PM";
foreach (string s in strInput.Split(new[]{'\r', '\n'}, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries))
{
    bResult |= Regex.IsMatch(s, @"^[+]+.+[AP]M$");
}

or for getting results use:

var listResult = new List<string>();
String strInput = @"+++++tom cruise 9:44AM something text here \r\n +++++mark taylor 9:21PM";
foreach (string s in strInput.Split(new[]{'\r', '\n'}, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries))
{
    listResult.Add(Regex.Match(s, @"^[+]+(?<result>.+)[AP]M$").Groups["result"].Value);
}
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This is the exact regex code that searches for the strings as you required

 string str = "+++++tom cruise 9:44AM something text here \r\n +++++mark taylor 9:21PM asdasd";
        var fileNames = from Match m in Regex.Matches(str, @"\++\++\++\++\++.+(PM|AM)")
                         select m.Value;
        foreach (var s in fileNames)
        {
            Response.Write(s.ToString() + "\r\n");
        }
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1  
No, it doesn't. It will find any sequence of plus signs, without requiring a string of 5. –  Ben Voigt Jul 5 '12 at 5:17
    
@BenVoigt That does not count it for -1. I have edited the regex. I guess Its better now. –  akhil Jul 5 '12 at 5:22
    
Thanks it worked...Thanks everyone for quick responses. –  user1502952 Jul 5 '12 at 5:35
    
Will be Most Welcome if you accept the answer as well. :) –  akhil Jul 5 '12 at 5:38
    
but what if i don't know how many sequences of +++++ are there in a string , how i will specify inside Regex.Matches(str,@"") –  user1502952 Jul 5 '12 at 5:48

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