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I have a question on Date difference in (My)Sql with c#.
In my database, I have a table containing date ranges like the following:

------------------------
From date      to date
-------------------------
2012-07-01    2012-07-03
2012-07-05    2012-07-07
2012-07-10    2012-07-12
2012-07-13    2012-07-16
--------------------------

From those ranges, i want to calculate all included dates as result, i.e.:

2012-07-01 
2012-07-02 
2012-07-03 
2012-07-05 
2012-07-06 
2012-07-07 
2012-07-10 
2012-07-11 
2012-07-12 
2012-07-13 
2012-07-14 
2012-07-15
2012-07-16

SELECT DATEDIFF('2012-01-01', '2012-02-02') does not work as I expect, it gives only total number of days... i want all the dates between this, including the dates of the range (FromDate and ToDate).

Can you show me how I can implement this (in SQL or C#) ?

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4  
dono where i m wrong.. its in mysql inline query from c# - And you expect us knowing this without showing your code? Sorry mate, we cannot read your mind. –  Darin Dimitrov Jul 5 '12 at 6:58
    
If I execute that code in MySql, the result is -32. You need to explain more what you are trying to achieve and what code you currently have to try to achieve it. –  Michael Jul 5 '12 at 7:26
    
Thanks for the effort @michael you got -32 .. right.. i want all the 32 dates... if SELECT DATEDIFF('2012-01-01', '2012-02-03') .. i want 2012-01-01, 201-01-02, 2012-01-03. –  Learner Jul 5 '12 at 7:34
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3 Answers

I've provided two possible solutions, first in C# using LINQ, second in SQL using a recursive CTE technique to generate the dates. Feel free to pick the one you like more.

I. Solution using LINQ:

You mentioned that you are using C# - in this case you can take advantage of LINQ and the solution is the following program (console application example which you can run in LinqPad or in VisualStudio).

    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var query1 = from r in RangeTable.AsQueryable() select r;
        query1.Dump("List of ranges:");

        Console.WriteLine();
        query1.CreateDates().Dump("Result list of dates:");

        Console.ReadLine();
    }

Where RangeTable is a property returning the range table as queryable object list (e.g. using LinqToEntity or LinqToSQL).

The interesting part is the extension method CreateDates:

    public static IQueryable<DateTime> CreateDates(this IQueryable<DateRange> rtbl)
    {
        var result = new List<DateTime>();

        foreach (var dr in rtbl)
        {
            var q = from i in Enumerable.Range(0, dr.CalcDays())
                    select (DateTime)dr.fromDate.AddDays(i);
            foreach (var d in q) result.Add(d);
        }

        return result.AsQueryable<DateTime>();
    }

This function is using a simple extension method CalcDays calculating the number of days between fromDate and toDate (if fromDate and toDate is equal, 1 is returned intentionally):

    public static int CalcDays(this DateRange dr)
    {
        var days = (int)(dr.toDate - dr.fromDate).TotalDays + 1;
        return days;
    }

Now some details about the RangeTable function. It needs the class DateRange which implements the two properties for the date range:

public class DateRange
{
    public DateTime fromDate;
    public DateTime toDate;
}

In this example RangeTable is defined without database connection for simplicity, but can use LinqToSQL or LinqToEntity as well:

    private static List<DateRange> RangeTable
    {
        get
        {
            var result = new List<DateRange>() {
                new DateRange() { fromDate = new DateTime(2012, 07, 01), toDate = new DateTime(2012, 07, 03) },
                new DateRange() { fromDate = new DateTime(2012, 07, 05), toDate = new DateTime(2012, 07, 07) },
                new DateRange() { fromDate = new DateTime(2012, 07, 10), toDate = new DateTime(2012, 07, 12) },
                new DateRange() { fromDate = new DateTime(2012, 07, 13), toDate = new DateTime(2012, 07, 16) }
            };
            return result;
        }
    }

Finally, if you don't have LinqPad and want to use the example in VisualStudio instead, you can easily define the two Dump extension methods as follows:

    const string dateMask = "yyyy-MM-dd";

    public static void Dump(this IQueryable<DateRange> item, string msg)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(msg);
        foreach (var i in item)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(string.Format("{0} to {1}", i.fromDate.ToString(dateMask), i.toDate.ToString(dateMask)));
        }
    }

    public static void Dump(this IQueryable<DateTime> item, string msg)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(msg);
        foreach (var i in item)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(string.Format("{0}", i.ToString(dateMask)));
        }
    }

Just place them into a top level public static class Extensions along with the other extension methods. Note: The class DateRange is a top level class and the method RangeTable is defined within the internal Program class.

The sample produces the following output:

    List of ranges:
    2012-07-01 to 2012-07-03
    2012-07-05 to 2012-07-07
    2012-07-10 to 2012-07-12
    2012-07-13 to 2012-07-16

    Result list of dates:
    2012-07-01
    2012-07-02
    2012-07-03
    2012-07-05
    2012-07-06
    2012-07-07
    2012-07-10
    2012-07-11
    2012-07-12
    2012-07-13
    2012-07-14
    2012-07-15
    2012-07-16

One final note:

LinqToEntity and LinqToSQL are the "bridge" to your database.

They are object-relational mappers, which translate your LINQ statements into SQL by using the appropriate database driver (via the database connection you specify) and submit the SQL queries "just in time", and they hide implementation specific details about the database, so you can focus on programming standardized LINQ queries.

In this example, you need to modify the property RangeTable so it queries your mySQL database and returns an IQueryable object. All you need to to is the following:

  • to add a new connection to LinqPad, then drill down to the table you need and finally drag & drop to the query (or, if the name already matches, just add the connection then click connect).
  • to use LinqToEntities: Add New Item to your project, in "data" select "ADO.NET Entity Data Model", then select "Generate from database", add desired database connection, add tables. It will generate a Model1.edmx file. If you tested this with Nortwind for example, then a sample query would look like:

        var entities = new NorthwindEntities1();
        entities.Connection.Open();
        var query1 = from c in entities.Customers select c;
    

II. Solution using SQL:

You can also use a common table expression (aka CTE) available in T-SQL 2008 to solve this:

with 
    sampleTable as (
        select   CAST('2012-07-05' as DATETIME) fromDt
                ,CAST('2012-07-08' as DATETIME) toDt
        union
        select   CAST('2012-08-01' as DATETIME) fromDt
                ,CAST('2012-08-11' as DATETIME) toDt
    ),
    calcdiff as (
        select  DATEDIFF(day, fromDt, toDt) d 
                ,*
        from sampleTable
    ),
    recursion as (
            select fromDt as dt, toDt from calcdiff
        union all
            select dateadd(day, 1, dt) dt2, toDt from recursion
            where dateadd(day, 1, dt)<=toDt
    )
select dt as Result from recursion
order by dt

SampleTable can be replaced by your "real" SQL table, it is just used for completeness of this example, calcdiff calculates the date differences, and recursion calculates all the dates required recursively: The first part of the union is the anchor of the recursion which is mandatory. Note that union all is required in the CTE recursion, otherwise T-SQL will not execute the query.

In case you're getting an error due to the recursion level, just append

option (maxrecursion 365);

This will allow "deeper" recursions, for instance if you're calculating the dates for 1 year it will be needed.

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Thanks Mate.. But check what i did.. –  Learner Jul 5 '12 at 10:02
1  
Yes, that's the traditional ADO.NET way you've used. But check out LINQ too, it is very powerful and not limited to databases. You can query everything that is enumerable, including sorting, filtering, joining etc. In the LinqPad tool (which is for free) are many examples running with Northwind... have fun! –  Matt Jul 5 '12 at 10:27
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If I understand you correctly, you have a table that contains the following:

------------------------
From date      to date
-------------------------
2012-07-01    2012-07-03
2012-07-05    2012-07-07
2012-07-10    2012-07-12
2012-07-13    2012-07-16
--------------------------

And you want to run SQL against it and get back all of the dates between every 'From date' and 'to date' listed.

Simplistically (ie. without thinking about it too hard), MySql doesn't do that - it returns existing records from a table. Since you are already in a c# application, it would seem easier to read the records from MySql and create your own List of all the relevant dates (although this would depend on what you then want to do with them).

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thanks now i try in c# . Sad to know that MySql dnt have that. –  Learner Jul 5 '12 at 7:45
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thanks all I fixed it in C#.. cant find anything in mysql.

dtDetails is a datatable with values from DB (fromdate and to date)

Then i created one more datatable and stored all the values from (fromdate -- todate)

then i will use that datatable.

if (dtDetails.Rows.Count > 0)

{ foreach (DataRow dr in dtDetails.Rows) { DateTime startingDate = Convert.ToDateTime( dr["fromdate"]); DateTime endingDate = Convert.ToDateTime(dr["todate"]); DateTime newdate; for (newdate = startingDate; newdate <= endingDate; newdate = newdate.AddDays(1)) { DataRow dr2 = dt2.NewRow(); dt2.Rows.Add(newdate); } } }
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