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Is there a difference in the runtime of the following two snippets?

SNIPPET 1:

for ( Object obj : collection ) {
    step1( obj );
    step2( obj );
    step3( obj );
}

SNIPPET 2:

for ( Object obj : collection ) {
    step1( obj );
}

for ( Object obj : collection ) {
    step2( obj );
}

for ( Object obj : collection ) {
    step3( obj );
}
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Depending on the implementation of step1, step2 and step3, the compiler may compile the latter to the same (byte)code as the former. But, why don't you time it yourself? –  Stephan202 Jul 15 '09 at 20:52
    
No it wouldn't. The calls are made in different orders. If objects are a, b, c, etc. The calls are a1, a2, a3, b1, b2, b3, etc in first example but they are a1, b1, a2, b2, a3, c3 in the second example. –  FogleBird Jul 16 '09 at 0:42
    
They have the same Big-O, but contrary to most claims below, it is impossible to know which will be faster at runtime without knowing what step1, step2, and step3 do. There's code-cache coherency, data-cache coherency, branch prediction accuracy...any number of things that can change the runtime performance. Timing it yourself is the only way to "know," and even so, the results are still specific to your hardware. –  Not Sure Jul 16 '09 at 0:45

6 Answers 6

Of course. The first snippet iterates through the collection only once while the second snippet does it 3 separate times. The second snippet also violates the DRY principle.

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Intuitively it would seem you're right but I don't see a difference in runtime performance. Each snippet executes 3N steps, where N is the size of the collection. Some languages have overhead associated with iteration but if we ignore that, I don't see a huge difference betweem the two. –  os111 Jul 15 '09 at 20:57
    
Well if you ignore the iteration difference, what other difference would there be? They're the same then. –  ryeguy Jul 15 '09 at 21:00
    
+1 for DRY ... plus, if it's a mutable collection (or some object that implements Iterable but isn't really a collection), you might get different operations on each object –  kdgregory Jul 15 '09 at 21:02
    
obviously i would never write code like this. but my question is more abstract. currently i have each step iterating over the collection anew. these steps are independent. if i refactor to look like snippet 1, i lose readability (the steps have no reason to be in the same loop or method). am i really suffering a performance degredation with snippet 2? i don't think so. –  os111 Jul 15 '09 at 21:07

If you are asking about any language, SNIPPET 1 should be faster.

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The iterations are made 3 times.

Also, you will call step1(obj) n times, then step2(obj) n times, then step3(obj) n times.

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If one of your method calls will throw an exception, lets say step1 in the middle of the iteration then the second version will stop earlier than the first one. But if step3 throws an exception for the first element then the first version is faster. So the two versions are not equivalent semantically.

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Is there any difference? Of course.

Is there a difference that matters? It all depends.

If StepN() takes a few nanoseconds, then yes. Otherwise, probably not.

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Are you asking specifically about performance?

In that case, the answer depends on how fast the collection's iterator is: if Next() is an expensive operation for that particular iterator, then you pay that cost N times in the first version and 3N times in the latter. This is insignificant if your collection is a vector, but more serious when your collection is, say, an interface to some slow file I/O operation.

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