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Can you help me to find a simple tutorial of how sign a string using ECDSA algorithm in java. But without using any third-party libraries like bouncycastle. Just JDK 7. I found it difficult to search a simple example, I'm new to cryptography.


import java.io.*;
import java.security.*;

public class GenSig {

    /**
     * @param args the command line arguments
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        /*
         * Generate a DSA signature
         */

        try {

            /*
             * Generate a key pair
             */

            KeyPairGenerator keyGen = KeyPairGenerator.getInstance("DSA", "SUN");
            SecureRandom random = SecureRandom.getInstance("SHA1PRNG", "SUN");

            keyGen.initialize(1024, random);

            KeyPair pair = keyGen.generateKeyPair();
            PrivateKey priv = pair.getPrivate();
            PublicKey pub = pair.getPublic();

            /*
             * Create a Signature object and initialize it with the private key
             */

            Signature dsa = Signature.getInstance("SHA1withDSA", "SUN");

            dsa.initSign(priv);

            String str = "This is string to sign";
            byte[] strByte = str.getBytes();
            dsa.update(strByte);

            /*
             * Now that all the data to be signed has been read in, generate a
             * signature for it
             */

            byte[] realSig = dsa.sign();
            System.out.println("Signature: " + new String(realSig));


        } catch (Exception e) {
            System.err.println("Caught exception " + e.toString());
        }
    }
}

How to modify it for ECDSA?

share|improve this question
    
Look for any example that uses DSA, but use these algorithms instead: EC provider –  GregS Jul 5 '12 at 11:00
    
for example if I use this tutorial, what should I change here? java2s.com/Code/Java/Security/Testthesignature.htm or using this one docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/security/apisign/step1.html should I place instead of dsa ecdsa? –  user1379574 Jul 5 '12 at 11:12
2  
Please accept some answers by clicking on the V mark next to the correct one. Or tell us (and in this case GregS) why the question hasn't been answered satisfactory. –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Jul 11 '12 at 19:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Here is small example based on your example.

import java.math.BigInteger;
import java.security.KeyPair;
import java.security.KeyPairGenerator;
import java.security.PrivateKey;
import java.security.PublicKey;
import java.security.SecureRandom;
import java.security.Signature;

public class ECDSAExample {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        /*
         * Generate an ECDSA signature
         */

        /*
         * Generate a key pair
         */

        KeyPairGenerator keyGen = KeyPairGenerator.getInstance("EC");
        SecureRandom random = SecureRandom.getInstance("SHA1PRNG");

        keyGen.initialize(256, random);

        KeyPair pair = keyGen.generateKeyPair();
        PrivateKey priv = pair.getPrivate();
        PublicKey pub = pair.getPublic();

        /*
         * Create a Signature object and initialize it with the private key
         */

        Signature dsa = Signature.getInstance("SHA1withECDSA");

        dsa.initSign(priv);

        String str = "This is string to sign";
        byte[] strByte = str.getBytes("UTF-8");
        dsa.update(strByte);

        /*
         * Now that all the data to be signed has been read in, generate a
         * signature for it
         */

        byte[] realSig = dsa.sign();
        System.out.println("Signature: " + new BigInteger(1, realSig).toString(16));

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
What curve would that be? P-256? –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Jul 5 '12 at 23:46
    
I was afraid someone would ask that. I don't know, P-256 would be my guess though. –  GregS Jul 5 '12 at 23:47
    
Yup, looks like it –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Jul 5 '12 at 23:53
    
Running it in the debugger and cheating a little reveals: secp256r1 [NIST P-256, X9.62 prime256v1] –  GregS Jul 5 '12 at 23:57
    
Oh, I just cast it to the ECPrivateKey and got the curve :) I like to explicitly name the curve though. –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Jul 5 '12 at 23:58

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