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I'm trying to randomly pick a character from an array, concatenate it to the string "array_" and then use the new string to reference an array.

For instance, pick the character '8' from temp_holder[], concatenate it to "array_", and use it to reference array_8[][].

Here is the code:

#include <stdio.h>

main() {
   int i, j;

   char array_8[5][4];
   //Array
   for (i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
      for (j = 0; j < 4; j++) {
          array_8[i][j] = 'x';
          if ((i == 1 && j == 1) || (i == 1 && j == 2) || (i == 3 && j == 1) || (i == 3 && j == 2) ){
             array_8[i][j] = ' ';
          }
      }
  }


  char myArray[5][4];
  //Array
   for (i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
      for (j = 0; j < 4; j++) {
          myArray[i][j] = 'x';
          if ((i == 1 && j == 1) || (i == 1 && j == 2) || (i == 3 && j == 1) || (i == 3 && j == 2) ){
             myArray[i][j] = ' ';
          }
      }
  }

  char temp_holder[6] = {'8', '8', '8', '8', '8'};
  srand(time(NULL));
  int r = rand() % 6; 

  char arrName[1][10] = {"array_"}; 
  char namesArr[10];
  strcpy(namesArr, "array_");
  int len = 7;
  char arr_names[5][4];
  printf("\n%c\n", temp_holder[r]);
  strcat(namesArr, &temp_holder[r]);
  printf("\n%s\n", namesArr);
  strncpy(arr_names, namesArr, len);
  strcat(arr_names, "\0"); 
  printf("\n%s\n", arr_names);


  int accEntry = 0; //Correct entry counter
  for (i = 0; i < 5; ++i){
      for (j = 0; j < 4; j++ )
       if (myArray[i][j] == arr_names[i][j]){
          printf("\n MATCH FOUND  %c\n", arr_names[i][j]);
          accEntry++;
       }
   } 

   printf("\n\n\n%d\n\n\n", accEntry);

   getchar();
}
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Variable names are for the programmer, not for the program. –  Lundin Jul 5 '12 at 11:20

4 Answers 4

Unless you create your own name to array lookup table, you can't do what you are trying to do. Assuming you have a POSIX system, you can refer to global symbols by name, but you have to use dlopen/dlsym to do so. If the variable or function name is not coming from a shared library, then you have to link the program with -rdynamic when compiling with GCC, or whatever the equivalent is for your system.

#include <assert.h>
#include <dlfcn.h>

char array_8[][10] = { "hello", "world" };

int main ()
{
    void *h = dlopen(0, RTLD_NOW);
    void *p = dlsym(h, "array_8");
    assert(p == array_8);
    dlclose(h);
}
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For instance, pick the character "8", from temp_holder[], concatenate it to "array_" and use it to reference array_8[][]

You can't do that in C. The names of the variables are meaningless at runtime, i.e. you can't "get a variable by name".

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you obviously can't do that. you can use a array of pointers, which can be used to hold the references to your arrays.

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Your solution seems most plausible to me since i'm not that good at C. If you could show me an example of your solution, that would be most helpful. –  diamondtrust66 Jul 5 '12 at 19:52

You could use a hash table to store pointers to the arrays, that way you can access them by name.

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