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In F# interactive, I can find the type of sprintf.

>sprintf;;
val it : (Printf.StringFormat<'a> -> 'a) = <fun:clo@163>

I can find the type of sprintf curried with the first parameter, if the curried function is not generic.

> sprintf "%g";;
val it : (float -> string) = <fun:it@134-16>

But if it is generic, then I get the value restriction error.

> sprintf "%A";;
error FS0030: Value restriction. The value 'it' has been inferred to have generic type
val it : ('_a -> string)    
Either make the arguments to 'it' explicit or, if you do not intend for it to be generic, add a type annotation.

I can add a type annotation to get rid of the value restriction like this, specializing the function for a type, eg. DateTime.

>let f : (DateTime -> string) = sprintf "%A";;
val f : (DateTime -> string)

How can I add the type annotation without the binding? I've tried the following ...

>sprintf "%A" : (DateTime -> string);;
error FS0010: Unexpected symbol ':' in interaction. Expected incomplete structured construct at or before this point, ';', ';;' or other token.

This is a similar example but harder ...

>sprintf "%a";;
error FS0030: Value restriction. The value 'it' has been inferred to have generic type
val it : ((unit -> '_a -> string) -> '_a -> string)    
Either make the arguments to 'it' explicit or, if you do not intend for it to be generic, add a type annotation.
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You just need to enclose your expression in parenthesis:

open System;;
(sprintf "%A" : DateTime -> string);;

val it : (DateTime -> string) = <fun:it@2>

That way you can specify the type annotation without the binding.

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You can also simplify the annotation a bit and specify only the DateTime part: (sprintf "%A" : DateTime -> _). The compiler can still infer the return type. –  Tomas Petricek Jul 5 '12 at 8:54
    
Partial annotation works great. The harder example then becomes: (sprintf "%a" : (_ -> DateTime -> string) -> _ -> _). –  philderbeast Jul 5 '12 at 10:53
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What is actually happening is that fsi binds the last thing you type to a variable called it. It effectively does

let it = sprintf "%a";;

Type annotations would need to go on the left hand side of the = which you can't access. The problem is that you need a concrete type to give to any variable (in this case it). A workaround could be

(fun t:DateTime -> sprintf "%a" t)
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