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Here are my attempts with error messages. What am I doing wrong?

string.decode("ascii", "ignore")

UnicodeEncodeError: 'ascii' codec can't encode character u'\xa0' in position 37: ordinal not in range(128)

string.encode('utf-8', "ignore")

UnicodeDecodeError: 'ascii' codec can't decode byte 0xc2 in position 37: ordinal not in range(128)

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What's the value of string ? What type is it? –  Marco de Wit Jul 5 '12 at 9:23
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3 Answers 3

up vote 19 down vote accepted

You can't decode a unicode, and you can't encode a str. Try doing it the other way around.

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Accurate but possibly a bit telegraphic so I've added a more detailed explanation. –  Duncan Jul 5 '12 at 11:03
    
Wise words... I wish I had read that earlier –  Remiz Nov 6 '12 at 15:36
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Am I the only one who thinks Python has this the wrong way around? When I turn a python string into it's binary utf-8 representation, surely that should be termed "encoding", and not the other way around? –  rogueprocess Apr 4 '13 at 20:05
    
@rogueprocess Python has it the opposite way from what you're describing: u"\u2603".encode('utf8') returns a string of bytes in the utf-8 representation, and "\xe2\x98\x83".decode('utf8') returns a Unicode string. –  ojrac May 3 '13 at 18:44
    
That is a fantastic presentation, and the clearest explanation I've seen so far. Thank you for posting the link. –  culix Jun 30 at 2:46
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Guessing at all the things omitted from the original question, but, assuming Python 2.x the key is to read the error messages carefully: in particular where you call 'encode' but the message says 'decode' and vice versa, but also the types of the values included in the messages.

In the first example string is of type unicode and you attempted to decode it which is an operation converting a byte string to unicode. Python helpfully attempted to convert the unicode value to str using the default 'ascii' encoding but since your string contained a non-ascii character you got the error which says that Python was unable to encode a unicode value. Here's an example which shows the type of the input string:

>>> u"\xa0".decode("ascii", "ignore")

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#7>", line 1, in <module>
    u"\xa0".decode("ascii", "ignore")
UnicodeEncodeError: 'ascii' codec can't encode character u'\xa0' in position 0: ordinal not in range(128)

In the second case you do the reverse attempting to encode a byte string. Encoding is an operation that converts unicode to a byte string so Python helpfully attempts to convert your byte string to unicode first and, since you didn't give it an ascii string the default ascii decoder fails:

>>> "\xc2".encode("ascii", "ignore")

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#6>", line 1, in <module>
    "\xc2".encode("ascii", "ignore")
UnicodeDecodeError: 'ascii' codec can't decode byte 0xc2 in position 0: ordinal not in range(128)
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This is the best explanation of this problem I've ever read. –  cerberos Nov 18 '13 at 11:45
    
This explains the myth. –  foresightyj Dec 24 '13 at 5:22
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That's because your input string can’t be converted according to the encoding rules (strict by default).

I don't know, but I always encoded using directly unicode() constructor, at least that's the ways at the official documentation:

unicode(your_str, errors="ignore")
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