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Okay, so all of the code below is not my own. I've been following a tutorial on the internet, but when I try and run it, no password seems to be matching. I believe there may be an error with salting the password as what is in the database is nowhere near the 64 characters that is described in the login.php script. I have no idea. Code is below:

register.php

// Create a 256 bit (64 characters) long random salt
// Let's add 'something random' and the username
// to the salt as well for added security
$salt = hash('sha256', uniqid(mt_rand(), true) . 'something random' . strtolower($username));

// Prefix the password with the salt
$hash = $salt . $password;

// Hash the salted password a bunch of times
for ( $i = 0; $i < 100000; $i ++ )
{
    $hash = hash('sha256', $hash);
}

// Prefix the hash with the salt so we can find it back later
$hash = $salt . $hash;

// carry on with registration code...

login.php

$email = $_POST['email'];
$password = $_POST['password'];

$con = mysql_connect("localhost", "redacted", "redacted", "redacted");

$sql = '
    SELECT
        `password`
    FROM `users`
        WHERE `email` = "' . mysql_real_escape_string($email) . '"
    LIMIT 1
    ;';

$r = mysql_fetch_assoc(mysql_query($sql));

// The first 64 characters of the hash is the salt
$salt = substr($r['password'], 0, 64);

$hash = $salt . $password;

// Hash the password as we did before
for ( $i = 0; $i < 100000; $i ++ )
{
    $hash = hash('sha256', $hash);
}

$hash = $salt . $hash;

if ( $hash == $r['password'] )
{
    session_start();
    header('Location: /quiz/index.php');
}

if( $hash != $r['password'] ){
    session_start();
    header('Location: /?error=4');
}

// end login script
share|improve this question
    
Which tutorial? PHP has a slew of shitty tutorials on the web. This appears to be one of them. –  alex Jul 5 '12 at 7:50
3  
A common error is when database fields are not long enough to store all the characters. –  Konerak Jul 5 '12 at 7:53
    
Ahhh... that's why. My password field was just 30 characters. Cheers @Konerak :-) –  Jack Griffiths Jul 5 '12 at 7:56
    
@JackGriffiths let me make an answer out of that so you can mark the question as answered, and for easier future reference to future visitors. You can use the accept rate, too ;] –  Konerak Jul 5 '12 at 8:40
    
@Konerak Done! Cheers again. :-) –  Jack Griffiths Jul 5 '12 at 11:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A common error is when database fields are not long enough to store all the characters. The password then will never equal what the user entered.

For this kind of functionality, always write unit tests that check if the function (still) works as expected. One day someone will modify the database, change the hash algorithm, modify the salt... and noone will be able to log in.

share|improve this answer

It looks like you are adding the salt 2 times:

$hash = $salt . $password;

// Hash the password as we did before
for ( $i = 0; $i < 100000; $i ++ )
{
    $hash = hash('sha256', $hash);
}

//skip the below one
$hash = $salt . $hash;

Update:

Indeed, adding the salt 2 times is needed in this case.

Although, the salt should be kept in a separate db column, so the code will be much more simplified - by avoiding all the string concatenations for storing/retrieving the salt.

Besides that, your db structure will be closer to the 3rd normal form by storing each piece of information in a separate slot.

share|improve this answer
3  
Skip the whole "hash it numerous times" too. Just use something where you can introduce a work factor, bcrypt is often recommended. –  alex Jul 5 '12 at 7:52
2  
You need to store the salt with the hash so that you can know what it is after. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jul 5 '12 at 7:52
    
It turns out that my database field for password was too short. But thanks for all the suggestions. –  Jack Griffiths Jul 5 '12 at 7:58
    
if you keep the salt in a different db column, your code simplifies very much and your db gets used as it should –  Tudor Constantin Jul 5 '12 at 8:00
    
Sorry, this is wrong.You NEED to add the salt two times: the first time, so it is hashed with the password (the actual point of the salt). The second time, to be able to retrieve the salt. A better option would be to store the salt in a separate db column, and renaming the variables in this script wouldn't hurt either. Everything is $hash, before hashing as well as after. $tohash ,$hashed and $salt_with_hashed might be clearer variable names. –  Konerak Jul 5 '12 at 9:04

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