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I am trying to make a grid that is not dependent on a preset number of columns. I created a small sample to show the situation:

<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<html>
<head>
  <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
  <title>Grid in HTML5 and CSS3</title>
<style>

* {margin:0;padding:0;}
.row {display:block;position:relative;clear:both;}
.row>* {display:block;position:relative;clear:both;float:left;clear:none;width:100%;}
.row>*:empty {width:0px;}

/* one column in the row */
.row>:nth-last-child(1):nth-child(1) {width:100%;} 

/* two columns in the row */
.row>:nth-last-child(2):nth-child(1) {width:50%;} 
.row>:nth-last-child(1):nth-child(2) {width:50%;} 

/* three columns in the row */
.row>:nth-last-child(3):nth-child(1) {width:33.33%;} 
.row>:nth-last-child(2):nth-child(2) {width:33.33%;}
.row>:nth-last-child(1):nth-child(3) {width:33.34%;} 
.row>:empty:nth-last-child(3):nth-child(1)+:not(:empty) {width:66.66%;} 
.row>:empty:nth-last-child(2):nth-child(2)+:not(:empty) {width:66.67%;}

article {margin:.5em;border:1px solid green;border-radius:.3em;padding:.5em; }
</style>

</head>
<body>

<section class="row">
<div>
<article>
<p>This row has only one child.</p>
</article>
</div>
</section>

<section class="row">
<div>
<article>
<p>This row has two children</p>
</article>
</div>
<div>
<article>
<p>This is the second child</p>
</article>
</div>
</section>

<section class="row">
<div>
<article>
<p>
This row has three children
</p>
</article>
</div>
<div>
<article>
<p>So this is col 2 of 3</p>
</article>
</div>
<div>
<article>
<p>And this is col 3 of 3.</p>
</article>
</div>
</section>

<section class="row">
<div></div>
<div>
<article>
<p>The first child of this row is empty so spanned with the second</p>
</article>
</div>
<div>
<article>
<p>This is the second column</p>
</article>
</div>
</section>

<section class="row">
<div>
<article>
<p>This is the first column</p>
</article>
</div>
<div></div>
<div>
<article>
<p>The second and third column are spanned</p>
</article>
</div>
</section>

</body>
</html>

I put a larger sample - describing the problems in more detail - on jsfiddle at

http://jsfiddle.net/jordenvanforeest/MDv32/

My problem now is that if you want this grid to accomodate for more than 3 columns, the CSS-size gets big exponentially. So I am looking for an other solution. I tried to do something like

.row>:nth-last-child(an+b):nth-child(cn+d) {} 

but my calculus skills are a bit rusty and I cannot get it to work properly. Help would be much appreciated.

update

thirtydot provided an answer that made the CSS much smaller. This fiddle is the improved version suggested by him.

Any other suggestions are still welcome. My 12 collumn Grid still needs 30K for the spanning.

share|improve this question
    
+1: Such a cool experiment! –  Jezen Thomas Jul 5 '12 at 8:12
    
Yes, but can you help? –  Jorden van Foreest Jul 5 '12 at 8:13
    
This is an interesting idea. Only downside is the current implementation requires empty divs, how would you see this being used in production? –  Sevenupcan Nov 1 '12 at 8:49
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1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can do something similar with display: table combined with table-layout: fixed.

Browser support: http://caniuse.com/css-table (but the limiting factor here is :not() and :empty)

See: http://jsfiddle.net/thirtydot/MDv32/3/

As you can see, it looks virtually identical. With some ingenuity, you should be able to replicate most of the functionality in your demo with the technique used in mine. I commented out the HTML in my demo where I stopped.

CSS:

.row {
    display: table;
    table-layout: fixed;
    width: 100%;
}
.row > * {
    display: table-cell;
}
.row > :empty {
    display: none;
}
/* for example: */
.row > :empty + :not(:empty) + :last-child:not(:empty) {
    width: 33.33%;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Brilliant! It seems to exactly what I want. Why are saying that it only does 90%? Am I missing someting? –  Jorden van Foreest Jul 5 '12 at 11:51
    
It might not behave identically when you have nested rows. It's probably close enough though, so I've changed that sentence. –  thirtydot Jul 5 '12 at 12:07
    
No all is right. Nesting works. –  Jorden van Foreest Jul 5 '12 at 18:33
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