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How can I find the order of nodes in an XML document?

What I have is a document like this:

<value code="1">
    <value code="11">
        <value code="111"/>
    </value>
    <value code="12">
        <value code="121">
            <value code="1211"/>
            <value code="1212"/>
        </value>
    </value>
</value>

and I'm trying to get this thing into a table defined like

CREATE TABLE values(
    code int,
    parent_code int,
    ord int
)

preserving the order of the values from the XML document (they can't be ordered by their code). I want to be able to say

SELECT code FROM values WHERE parent_code = 121 ORDER BY ord

and the results should, deterministically, be

code
1211
1212

I have tried

SELECT value.value('@code', 'varchar(20)') code, value.value('../@code', 'varchar(20)') parent, value.value('position()', 'int')
  FROM @xml.nodes('/root//value') n(value)
 ORDER BY code desc

but it doesn't accept the position() function ('position()' can only be used within a predicate or XPath selector).

I guess it's possible some way, but how?

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Do you have finite depth of nodes? If not, it's going to be a pain. And to confirm: you can not rely on codes? –  gbn Jul 16 '09 at 6:38
    
...and what output do you want from the xml? –  gbn Jul 16 '09 at 6:42
    
I updated the question to provide more information. And no, there is an infinite depth. –  erikkallen Jul 16 '09 at 8:16
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4 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You can emulate the position() function by counting the number of sibling nodes preceding each node:

SELECT
    code = value.value('@code', 'int'),
    parent_code = value.value('../@code', 'int'),
    ord = value.value('for $i in . return count(../*[. << $i]) + 1', 'int')
FROM @Xml.nodes('//value') AS T(value)

Here is the result set:

code   parent_code  ord
----   -----------  ---
1      NULL         1
11     1            1
111    11           1
12     1            2
121    12           1
1211   121          1
1212   121          2

How it works:

  • The for $i in . clause defines a variable named $i that contains the current node (.). This is basically a hack to work around XQuery's lack of an XSLT-like current() function.
  • The ../* expression selects all siblings (children of the parent) of the current node.
  • The [. << $i] predicate filters the list of siblings to those that precede (<<) the current node ($i).
  • We count() the number of preceding siblings and then add 1 to get the position. That way the first node (which has no preceding siblings) is assigned a position of 1.
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According to this document and this connect entry it is not possible, but the Connect entry contains two workarounds.

I do it like this:

WITH n(i) AS (SELECT 0 UNION SELECT 1 UNION SELECT 2 UNION SELECT 3 UNION SELECT 4 UNION SELECT 5 UNION SELECT 6 UNION SELECT 7 UNION SELECT 8 UNION SELECT 9),
     o(i) AS (SELECT n3.i * 100 + n2.i * 10 + n1.i FROM n n1, n n2, n n3)
SELECT v.value('@code', 'varchar(20)') AS code,
       v.value('../@code', 'varchar(20)') AS parent,
       o.i AS ord
  FROM o
 CROSS APPLY @xml.nodes('/root//value[sql:column("o.i")]') x(v)
 ORDER BY o.i
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Every-time I try to see if there is a good way to perform this I always feel like crying. It's the only way I have found (actually, I use a numbers table, but same ugly hack) -- it's an absolutely pathetic excuse for a server which "supports XML" and makes simple shredding and access much more complicated than it needs to be. –  user166390 Jan 12 '11 at 6:07
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The answer by erikkallen is absolutely correct.

However, if the original document/schema may be modified, an alternative is to store the position/index in an attribute. I use a mix of both approaches, depending who the "originator" of the XML is and the type of queries that need to be performed upon it. At the end of the day I rue most use of XML except possibly "dumb storage" in SQL Server and am usually happy when I can dump it (XML) for normalized tables.

Happy dealing with the unmentioned limitations of "enterprise-grade" products -- the wonders never end.

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+1 for your "rue most use of XML". It really sucks when you have to select nodes much less update them. –  Seth Spearman Jun 25 at 15:42
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You can get the position of the xml returned by a x.nodes() function like so:

row_number() over (partition by 0 order by nullif(0*rand(),0))

However using the rand() function means it cannot be used in a UDF.

Alternatively, this is deterministic so can be used in a UDF, but maybe slightly slower (but not noticeably to me):

row_number() over (partition by 0 order by nullif(0*x.value('count(.)','int'),0))

For example:

DECLARE @x XML
SET @x = '<a><b><c>abc1</c><c>def1</c></b><b><c>abc2</c><c>def2</c></b></a>'

SELECT
    b.query('.'),
    row_number() over (partition by 0 order by nullif(0*b.value('count(.)','int'), 0))
FROM
    @x.nodes('/a/b') x(b)
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