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I have a string which is of about 1mb size. The requirement is to reverse the string without allocating another temp string of size 1 MB. I tried the following code

string name = "abcde";

string target = "";
for(int i = name.Length - 1; i >=0; i--)
{
    target += name[i];
    name = name.Remove(i);                
    int n = name.Length;
}

but my friend says if we use the function name.Remove(i) it will return a new string but it is not guaranteed that the old string will be deleted from memory and so there is no guarantee that the size will be reduced. is it true? if so is there any other option available to reverse a string without allocating extra memory?

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1  
You could try writing it out to a file in reverse order then reading it back in :-) –  paxdiablo Jul 5 '12 at 9:00
    
@paxdiablo: nice idea, what will happen to the original string? can we guarantee its deletion –  Jeeva Jul 5 '12 at 9:02
    
Why the criteria of reversing without allowing extra memory? The garbage collector is pretty good at its job. –  Maarten Jul 5 '12 at 9:02
1  
Every time you do a name = name.Remove(i), another string gets created minus the character (as per my understanding of immutable objects). So, if that's true, you are creating a lot of string in order to achieve this. –  Shakti Prakash Singh Jul 5 '12 at 9:04
3  
Please be aware that simply reversing an array is no effective solution since this wont take into consideration surrogates and unicode mark codepoints which might lead to invalid or even broken strings –  Polity Jul 5 '12 at 9:16
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12 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Your string "abcde" is a constant in memory. You can't change it, as it is immutable. What you want is to create a new string, and for this you need new memory.

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use StringBuilder you can manupulate with char array, but not with string, bacause it's immutable

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Strings are immutable, and you can't reverse it without allocating new memory

String from MSDN

Strings are immutable--the contents of a string object cannot be changed after the object is created, although the syntax makes it appear as if you can do this.

From the same link see this example:

string b = "h";
b += "ello";

and the explanation.

when you write this code, the compiler actually creates a new string object to hold the new sequence of characters, and that new object is assigned to b. The string "h" is then eligible for garbage collection.

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Is it possible to reverse it with less memory than the original string? –  Jeeva Jul 5 '12 at 8:58
1  
@Jeeva, No, it is not. –  Filip Ekberg Jul 5 '12 at 9:04
    
@Jeeva, when you will reverse the string, your previous string will be eligible for garbage collection, you don't have to worry about it. –  Habib Jul 5 '12 at 9:16
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String are Immutables. When you declare it you can't change it. So whatever you try, will create and use new memory.

string name = "aaaaa":
name = name.Remove(0); // this is allocating new memory.
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If you have some control over the original data, you should be able to do this. E.g. if you can demand a char[] without ever creating a string, you can reverse it in place.

For example, in your example, you could have var name = new char[] { 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e'} instead of a string, and then reverse that in place.

(Obviously you can't do this for a 1MB string, but wherever you're getting your string from, if you can initially load it as a char[] instead...)

If you can only have a string, you're out of luck. They are immutable - you can only modify a string by copying it somehow.

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class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        //Note how I don't bother to use a variable?
        //This is a nasty hack that knows the compiler will intern the value.
        //One of the many downsides of hacking the BCL.
        while (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(Console.ReadLine()))
        {
            Console.WriteLine("he\0llo");  
            "he\0llo".ReverseInPlace();
        }
    }
}

public static class Helper
{
    //Does not support multi-char values.
    public static unsafe void ReverseInPlace(this string str)
    {
        fixed (char* pfixed = str)
            for (int i = 0, ii = str.Length - 1; i < str.Length / 2; i++, ii--)
            {
                var p1 = (char*)pfixed + i;
                var p2 = (char*)pfixed + ii;
                var temp = *p1;
                *p1 = *p2;
                *p2 = temp;
            }
    }
}

If you use this, you will likely die... or something. Heck, I don't even know how to write unsafe code.

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you can try with linq to reverse

    string original = "abcde";
    string reverseValue = new string(original.Reverse().ToArray());

you can try also with 

string result= new string(original.Select((c, index) => new { c, index })
                                         .OrderByDescending(x => x.index)
                                         .ToArray());
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2  
How is that not creating new Memory? –  MBen Jul 5 '12 at 8:59
    
@MBen if you initialize a local variable you store your value in the stack –  Aghilas Yakoub Jul 5 '12 at 9:13
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EDIT: Completely lost the plot, been using C++ too much recently I forgot C# strings are immutable.

In short, you have to allocate new memory to alter a string in C#. You can do this in the most straightforward way by doing something like this:

string ReverseString(string value)
{
    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(value))
    {
        char[] newBuffer = new char[value.Length];
        for(int i = 0; i < value.Length; i++)
            newBuffer[newBuffer.Length - i - 1] = value[i];
        value = new string(newBuffer);
    }
    return value;
}
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Are you sure? aren't string immutables? –  MBen Jul 5 '12 at 8:55
2  
Strings are immutable –  Trogvar Jul 5 '12 at 8:56
1  
Yeah, dunno what the hell I was thinking. Been using too much C++ lately it seems. –  Jason Larke Jul 5 '12 at 8:59
    
Strings are immutable, name[0] = 'e' does not compile. –  Maarten Jul 5 '12 at 9:00
    
Yes yes, I know. –  Jason Larke Jul 5 '12 at 9:02
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Practically there is no correct way for reversing a string without at least allocating the same amount of memory as is occupied by the string you want to reverse. (Theoretically its possible to reverse a string in memory but this is so dis recommended, i'm not even going to enter that area). Now as for reversing the string itself. I'm working on a little project called StringExtensions in which i try to hammer down all the gotchas that can occur when working with strings. One of the biggest gotchas is working with the UTF-16 encoding which is used extensively throughout the framework. My implementation of reversing a string looks something like this:

    static IEnumerable<Tuple<int, int>> GetTextElementSegments(string value)
    {
        int[] elementOffsets = StringInfo.ParseCombiningCharacters(value);

        int lastOffset = -1;
        foreach (int offset in elementOffsets)
        {
            if (lastOffset != -1)
            {
                int elementLength = offset - lastOffset;
                Tuple<int, int> segment = new Tuple<int,int>(lastOffset, elementLength);
                yield return segment;
            }

            lastOffset = offset;
        }

        if (lastOffset != -1)
        {
            int lastSegmentLength = value.Length - lastOffset;

            Tuple<int, int> segment = new Tuple<int, int>(lastOffset, lastSegmentLength);
            yield return segment;
        }
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string input = "t\u0301e\u0302s\u0303t\u0304";
        StringBuilder resultBuilder = new StringBuilder(input.Length);

        var segments = GetTextElementSegments(input);

        foreach (var segment in segments.Reverse())
        {
            resultBuilder.Append(input, segment.Item1, segment.Item2);
        }

        Debug.Assert(resultBuilder.ToString() == "t\u0304s\u0303e\u0302t\u0301s");
    }

Note that this takes care of surrogate pairs, unicode mark codepoints and only allocates memory similar to the amount occupied by the input string itself.

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If you're really serious about no additional allocations, you need to fix the string and use unsafe pointer code. Or, perhaps, get a reference to the internal char[] using reflection.

You really don't want to do this. Really. I mean, really. Please, don't do this except as a learning exercise. If people find code like that in production they're likely to come looking for you with a weapon.

I'm not going to attempt writing such code (as I know I'll get it wrong). But here are some links which would get you started:

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StringBuilder is Mutable and should give you the best possible efficiency in this case

string inpuStr = "The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog...blah blah blah up to 1MB";
StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
            for (int i = inpuStr.Length - 1; i >= 0; i--)
            {
                builder.Append(inpuStr[i]); 
            }
           return builder.ToString();
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This should help

string reverse = new string("ABCDEFGHI".ToCharArray().Reverse().ToArray());
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2  
This will still use extra memory. –  Rawling Jul 5 '12 at 9:02
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