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I was experimenting with generating truth tables in J:

    nand =: *:
    nand /~ 0 1
1 1
1 0
    bxor =: 22 b.  NB. Built-in bitwise XOR
    bxor /~ 0 1
0 1
1 0

Now I want to define my own logical xor, which I did like so:

    xor =: 3 : 0
]y                     NB. monadic case is just the identity
:
(x*.-.y)+.(y*.-.x)     NB. dyadic case is (x AND NOT y) OR (y AND NOT x)
)

This works as I expect when I call it directly.

    0 xor 0 1
0 1
    1 xor 0 1
1 0

But it doesn't generate a truth table:

    xor /~ 0 1
0 0

Why not?

I thought maybe the problem was that ]/~ 0 1 itself produced a 1 x 2 array, so I changed the monadic part to use nand (*:y) because it produces the 2x2 array:

    *:/~ 0 1
1 1
1 0


   xor =: 3 : 0
*:y                  NB. certainly wrong, but at least has 2x2 shape.
:
(x*.-.y)+.(y*.-.x)
)

But I still get the same behavior:

    xor /~ 0 1
0 0

Can someone help me understand the flaw in my thinking?

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Update: I found ~:, which implements logical XOR, and ~:/~ 0 1 builds the truth table correctly... But I still don't understand why my hand-coded one doesn't play nice with /~. –  tangentstorm Jul 5 '12 at 10:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your xor has infinite rank, while *:,~: have rank 0. You can verify that by using b.: v b. 0 like so:

~: b. 0
  _ 0 0 

*: b. 0
  0 0 0

xor b. 0
  _ _ _

What this means is that xor operates on the list 0 1 rather than on each individual atom 0, 1.

You will get the result you expect if you use xor with rank 0:

xor"0 /~ 0 1
0 1
1 0

Or if you define xor to be of rank 0.

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See here and here for ranks. The v b. 0 above gives the rank for monadic, dyadic-left, dyadic-right case of the verb v, respectively. –  Eelvex Jul 5 '12 at 11:28
    
Thanks! I'd been trying to understand what " did, too. Now I'm starting to see the pieces fit together. :) –  tangentstorm Jul 5 '12 at 11:44

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