Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In Bash I can use printf to format a string output like this:- (Note how I've added a suffix of W to the string and that this is not included in the padding)

$ printf "Blah %11.1fW\n" 123 456 78965 5 56
Blah       123.0W
Blah       456.0W
Blah     78965.0W
Blah         5.0W
Blah        56.0W

If I want to prefix the string I could do this:-

$ printf "Blah £%11.1f\n" 123 456 78965 5 56
Blah £      123.0
Blah £      456.0
Blah £    78965.0
Blah £        5.0
Blah £       56.0

However note how this results in the padding being applied before the prefix.

How (if at all possible) would I use printf to prefix the value before padding so the output would be as follows:-

Blah      £ 123.0
Blah      £ 456.0
Blah    £ 78965.0
Blah        £ 5.0
Blah       £ 56.0

If not possible any Bash solution would be appropriate.

share|improve this question
    
Are the accountants happy with this? In my experience printf style rounding cause accountants to faint. –  cdarke Jul 5 '12 at 10:47
    
@cdarke lol. This is an example only. No accountants are involved ! –  general exception Jul 5 '12 at 10:51
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I came up with this:

$ printf "Rate: %11s\n" $(printf "$%.1f " 12345 123)
Rate:    $12345.0
Rate:      $123.0

Just be sure the choose the correct %11s for your case.


It seems that you addressed that space problem yourself. For the sake of completeness, I will put that in here.

$ printf "Rate: %11s\n" $(printf "$%.1f " 12345 123) | sed 's/\$/\$ /g'
Rate:    $ 12345.0
Rate:      $ 123.0

Here's the solution given by @FatalError:

printf "Rate: %11b\n" $(printf '$\\0040%.1f ' 12345 123)
Rate:   $ 12345.0
Rate:     $ 123.0
share|improve this answer
    
Aha yes, the problem with this is when you introduce the space between the currency symbol and the data. –  general exception Jul 5 '12 at 10:42
    
Piping output into sed 's/\£/\£ /g' may help me here. –  general exception Jul 5 '12 at 10:45
1  
Without sed, you could: printf "Rate: %11b\n" $(printf '$\\0040%.1f ' 12345 123) –  FatalError Jul 5 '12 at 11:42
    
@FatalError Thats an awesome solution!! :) –  Thrustmaster Jul 5 '12 at 11:43
    
Eh, I don't like to wordsplit $() output but works in a pinch especially with printf. If Bash had some sort of zip function I'd probably use it 10 times a day for this sort of thing. –  ormaaj Jul 5 '12 at 11:49
add comment

Not possible. You'd need something like strfmon. Workaround:

$ a=(123 456 78965 5 56)
$ printf 'blah %*s %.1f\n' {,,,,}{$((10 - ${#a[n]})),£,"${a[n++]}"}
blah      £ 123.0
blah      £ 456.0
blah    £ 78965.0
blah        £ 5.0
blah       £ 56.0
share|improve this answer
    
That's ... beautiful. :-) –  Graham Jul 10 '12 at 12:04
add comment

While I love ormaaj's solution for keeping things in the shell, I don't like using subshells unless I really need them. And a line with both a subshell AND a pipe just seems ... unnecessary.

$ printf "Rate: %11.1f\n" 123 | sed 's/  \([0-9]\)/$ \1/'
Rate:     $ 123.0
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.