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im trying to do the following in my rails application:

lets say i have a class .foo

 .foo{ color:red;}

and i have another class .bar

.bar{ color:green;}

i want the color off the foo elements to be changed to say blue, ONLY when surrounded by a bar class

example : here i want "blah blah" to be blue

<div class = "bar" >
  <div class = "foo" >
  blah blah
  </div>
</div>

how do i do it? without using LESS or anything like that.

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

Write like this:

.bar .foo{
color:blue
}

& for more specific write like this:

.bar > .foo{
    color:blue
    }

Check this http://jsfiddle.net/DEmk7/1/

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1  
Maybe worth mentioning the > combinator as well, since 'surrounds' sort of suggests that it might be used only for an immediate child. – David Thomas Jul 5 '12 at 10:55

According to this example:

<div class = "bar" >
  <div class = "foo" >
  blah blah
  </div>
</div>

You can give your div with class foo an other class too.

<div class = "bar" >
  <div class = "foo blue" >
  blah blah
  </div>
</div>

In your css you write the following:

.foo{ color:red;}
.bar{ color:green;}
.blue{color:blue !important;}
share|improve this answer
1  
!important should generally be avoided in favour of using the natural css cascade, a useful article:coding.smashingmagazine.com/2010/11/02/… – Liquid Jul 5 '12 at 11:10
    
I don't think it's a problem to use it. It works fine, so for me there is no problem. – Sllix Jul 5 '12 at 11:12
1  
Thanks for keeping my comment @Liquid – Alex KeySmith Jul 5 '12 at 11:44
2  
Indeed Alex after reading that article I was immediately convinced so I'm trying to spread the word. – Liquid Jul 5 '12 at 11:48
    
Cool @Liquid :-) – Alex KeySmith Jul 5 '12 at 11:51

You can seperate css selectors by a space to specify nesting. e.g.

.bar .foo
{
    color:blue;
}

Notably in this format, it will match both:

<div class = "bar" >
  <div class = "foo" >
  blah blah
  </div>
</div>

and

<div class = "bar" >
  <div class = "yay" >
    <div class="foo">
      blah blah
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

Using the ">" child selector will allow you to target only direct children, meaning the one with yay won't be matched.

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