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I am searching for a C interface for bash shells. I.e. I would like to have a set of functions which allow me to open a session, execute commands, return the output (STDOUT,STDERR) and finally to close the shell. It could be a library or C source code based on standard libraries.

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I am not aware of any such interface. What is your use case? Anything where the set of commands isn't known in advance would probably turn out to be an ugly brittle hack. –  Jo So Jul 5 '12 at 11:22
    
@highsciguy seems to be looking for some expect like C library. –  FooF Jul 5 '12 at 12:00
    
Why? Anyway, simplest way (to get a persistent environment) would be to write out a shell script to a file then execute it using system. OK, a pipe would be faster, but you can't need fast otherwise you would not be using a shell at all. –  cdarke Jul 5 '12 at 12:09
    
This is a nice question and makes a lot of sense. system(3) will not cut it unless there is just a need to run isolated shell commands without regards of the output (either via stdout and stderr or environment variable manipulations etc). –  FooF Jul 5 '12 at 12:15
    
The reason for the question is that I want to write my own interactive terminal. One which uses vim. Existing vim based terminals are not useful though because I want to integrate it with an other interactive terminal I have written for a different script language. The basic principle is that vim pipes lines into a C-program which returns the results using a second pipe to vim. I will look through your replies later. –  highsciguy Jul 5 '12 at 16:24

2 Answers 2

The general root problem seems to be how to programmatically run interactive terminal program.

Now this would in my part require actual testing, but you would roughly need to

  1. create three pipes corresponding to child process stdin, stdout, and stderr (the parent process writing to stdin_pipe and reading stdout_pipe and stderr_pipe) using pipe(2) system call;
  2. fork and in the child close redirect the standard in, out and error to the proper ends of the above pipes by calling dup2(2);
  3. exec (execve(2) / execv(3)) your interactive shell;
  4. start writing commands to stdin_pipe and reading the errors and responses from the other two pipes.

(If you do not need to make the distinction between stdout and stderr you could just simplify your life by using popen(3) - you could probably redirect stderr to stdout by proper choice of command string).

For properly working solution, however, I believe you probably would need to use pseudo ttys (pty(7)) by calling forkpty(3) instead of just fork.

As it starts to get more and more complicated to take into account all the nyances of dealing with pseudo terminals, why not search for C expect library which should be able to do all this for you. Or emulate how expect or some other language equivalent like pexpect is implemented. Actually expect seems to provide a C library called libexpect(3) for you so that you do not need to write tcl/tk for programming the interaction. I am not personally familiar with the library, and there could be other better ones.

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1  
You'd need to use ptys, almost certainly. –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 6 '12 at 2:50
    
@JonathanLeffler - for more complicated scenarios yes, for sure. For example if the programs to run with shell require information about the terminal (like number of columns for ls). I think simple shell commands could perhaps still be run with trivial popen(3) + pclose(3) based approach (setting environment variables, running programs which do not care about terminals). In principle, I cannot see why shells like bash should not allow using them interactively without tty (although they certainly check whether you are running them using tty and adjust behavior accordingly). –  FooF Jul 6 '12 at 3:09

Are you looking to achieve something like this:

    #include<stdio.h>
    int main()
    {
      char a[1000];
      gets(a);
      system(a);
      return 0;
    }

Output:

./a.out
cat testing.c
#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
  char a[1000];
  gets(a);
  system(a);
  return 0;
}

gets() and system call can get inside a loop.

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Sure, but this will not have persistent environment. Most likely that is what OP is concerned about. –  Andrejs Cainikovs Jul 5 '12 at 11:21
    
Yes. For instance all the shell variables should be preserved between subsequent commands. –  highsciguy Jul 5 '12 at 16:27

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