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I have a base class (car) and a class that inherit the base class (honda):

class car
{
    virtual void polymorphic_class()
    {   }
};

class honda : public car
{   };


When I use the following code and I cast my class a get a null pointer:

list<car> cars;
honda h;
cars.push_back(h);
honda* h_ptr = dynamic_cast<honda*>(&cars.back());
// h_ptr is NULL

Why? How I have to cast properly my object?

share|improve this question
1  
There is no way to correctly do that cast. Your list is a list of cars. It does not (and cannot) contain hondas. – Charles Bailey Jul 5 '12 at 11:32
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Polymorphism works on pointers and references, not on object instances.

In this case, your list contains objects of type car, not of any derived type. When you insert a honda, it will copy the car part and ignore the rest; this is sometimes referred to as slicing.

For polymorphism, you could use a list of pointers:

list<car*> cars {new honda};
honda * h_ptr = dynamic_cast<honda*>(cars.back()); // should be a valid pointer

NOTE: If you do allocate using new as in my example, remember to either delete them, or store smart pointers (like std::unique_ptr<car>) rather than raw pointers. You'll also need a virtual destructor in order to delete objects using a base-class pointer.

You can avoid the slicing problem by making the base class abstract; if it contains pure virtual functions, then you can't instantiate objects of that type, only of derived types that override those functions:

class car
{
    virtual ~car() {}
    virtual void do_something() = 0;
};

class honda : public car
{
    void do_something() {}
};

If you don't actually want an abstract interface (e.g. if you only access derived-class functionality using dynamic_cast rather than through virtual functions), then you could make the destructor pure virtual instead; then the derived classes won't have to explicitly override anything. The base class destructor must still be implemented and, due to a quirk of the language, that implementation must be outside the class definition:

class car
{
    virtual ~car() = 0;
};
inline car::~car() {}

class honda : public car {};

This is a somewhat unusual approach, since polymorphism through virtual functions is usually more efficient and more convenient.

share|improve this answer

The reason this doesn't work is object slicing. The objects in cars are no longer hondas, but just cars.

You need a vector of pointers or smart pointers:

list<car*> cars;
honda h;
cars.push_back(&h);
honda* h_ptr = dynamic_cast<honda*>(cars.back());

I'd actually change the design and make car abstract (pure virtual destructor or something). That way you'll also get a compilation error.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't have compilation error with my code anyway. – Nick Jul 5 '12 at 11:35
3  
@Nick But wouldn't you like one? – R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 5 '12 at 11:35
    
@Nick I know you're not getting one now, but if you had one you could spot these problems early on. – Luchian Grigore Jul 5 '12 at 11:36

Try this

list<car*> cars;
honda *h = new honda();
cars.push_back(h);
honda* h_ptr = dynamic_cast<honda*>(cars.back());

This works.

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