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In C++, I have an object A that has a constructor that accepts an istream (to load itself from a file). I have another class that has an A as a member. I can't call A's constructor from the initialization list because I didn't open the istream yet. Once I open it in the constructor of my class, it is too late to call the constructor of A. Is there some way to open an istream in the initialization list into some temporary object so that I can send it to A's constructor?
And if there is, is there any type of guarantee on the order the initialization list is called so that the istream would get initialized before the A?

An example may help:

class A {
public:
  A(std::istream const&);
}

class B {
public:
  B(std::istream const&);
}

class MyClass {
  A a;
  B b;
public:
  MyClass() : a(is), b(is) {  // <-- How to do this?
    std::istream is("path");
  }
}
share|improve this question
    
It sounds like dependency injection might be a possible solution. This may also be an interesting read: misko.hevery.com/code-reviewers-guide/…. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jul 5 '12 at 11:50
    
@baruch What's the problem with creating a and b dynamically after you initialize the istream? –  Eitan T Jul 5 '12 at 11:55
    
@EitanT The istream is needed only before/during construction. Once the constructor starts running, and afterwards throughout the whole use of MyClass, I have no use for this istream –  baruch Jul 5 '12 at 12:02
    
@EitanT The are members, not pointers. The more automatic memory management I can get, the better. –  baruch Jul 5 '12 at 12:04
    
@baruch sure, but you have to settle for something. –  Eitan T Jul 5 '12 at 12:05

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's yet another idea... If you want to avoid dynamic allocations and use a single, temporary istream, you can move the load phase of A and B away from their constructor:

class A {
public:
  Load(std::istream const&);
}

class B {
public:
  Load(std::istream const&);
}

class MyClass {
  A a;
  B b;
public:
  MyClass() {
    std::istream is("path");
    a.Load(is);
    b.Load(is);
  }
}

This, BTW, calls for A and B inheriting the load abilities from some shared parent, but that's obviously beyond the scope of this question.

share|improve this answer
    
Why would A and B need to inherit from some shared parent? I used this, but skipped the inheritance thing, seeing no reason for it. –  baruch Jul 8 '12 at 5:31
    
@baruch, if both A and B have a Load(std::istream const&) method that does pretty much the same, you have code duplication. Using inheritance can eliminate that duplication. Since you don't need the inheritance to achieve polymorphism, you can even make it non-public. Or, you can delegate the call to some global function or a 3rd class. Just don't have two copies of the code that does the load. –  eran Jul 8 '12 at 6:13
    
Oh. I understand your point, but that is not my case. I have a system, MyClass that is made up of two separate systems, A and B. MyClass needs to be able to save it's state to file, and then reload it's state when next run. The two sub-systems' Load is totally different (One system is an index of strings, the other a tree of ints) –  baruch Jul 8 '12 at 9:28

Use pointers to objects instead:

class MyClass {
   A *a;
   B *b;
public:
   MyClass()
   {
       std::istream is("path");
       a = new A(is);
       b = new B(is);
   }
}

Don't forget to free the memory in the destructor.

share|improve this answer
    
Using std::unique_ptr would be a better idea. –  larsmans Jul 5 '12 at 12:09

As both member should depend on the same istream, why not:

class A {
public:
  A(std::istream const&);
}

class B {
public:
  B(std::istream const&);
}

class MyClass {
  A a;
  B b;
public:
  MyClass(std::istream const& is) : a(is), b(is) {
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Where's the initialization of is? Outside the class? –  Eitan T Jul 5 '12 at 12:33
    
of course, I would even prefer that, as it is less specific than a path. But I'm also wondering why A and B should live on the same instance. –  Arne Jul 5 '12 at 12:46

Maybe I'm missing something, but what's the problem with:

class MyClass {
    A* a;
    B* b;
public:
    MyClass() {
      std::istream is("path");
      a = new A(is);
      b = new B(is);
    }

    ~MyClass() {
        delete a;
        delete b;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yuck! Other then that, nothing really, except I was wandering if there was a way to do this in my 'cleaner' style. –  baruch Jul 5 '12 at 12:05

The initialization of the member variables of a class will happen in the order that you specify them in the class declaration.

Note that gcc will warn (given -Wall) when the order in the initializer list does not correspond to the order of declaration of the member variables. The declaration order in the class is authoritative.

class A {
public:
    A(std::istream const&);
}

class B {
public:
  B(std::istream const&);
}

class MyClass {
  std::istream is;
  A a;
  B b;
public:
  MyClass() : is("path"), a(is), b(is) {
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I like this, except that the member is has no use during the whole use of the class –  baruch Jul 5 '12 at 12:24
    
I would also add an is.close() to the beginning of the constructor –  baruch Jul 5 '12 at 12:32

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