Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to write a program that would convert celcius to fahrenheit and visa-versa. My program is compiling, but it gives me wrong results. I'm been trying to change it by changing pointers, but it wouldnt work. Can anyone please point out to me what is my problem? It seems to me it's in declarations and pointers, but i'm not sure.Thanks!

#include<stdio.h>

float f2c(float f);
float c2f(float c);

int main(void)
{
 float cel;
 float celcius;
 float fahren;
 float fah;
 char ch;
 float number;

scanf("%c %f", &ch, &number);

if(&ch == "-f"){
  f2c(number);
  celcius=f2c(number);
  printf("%f", celcius);
  }

 else{
  c2f(number);
  fahren = c2f(number);
  printf("%f", fahren);
  }

return 0;
}

float f2c(float f)
{
 float cel = (f - 32) * 5/9;
 return cel;
} 

float c2f(float c)
{
 float fah = (9 * c/5 + 32);
 return fah;
}
share|improve this question
2  
You should use the debugger to step through your program line-by-line; this will enable you to inspect what decisions it's making, and what the values of intermediate variables are. Alternatively, you could add lots of print statements to achieve a similar effect. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jul 5 '12 at 12:01

4 Answers 4

up vote -1 down vote accepted

Use floating-point arithmetic, not integer arithmetic, because in integer arithmetic, 5/9 is 0. So you could make this change to your code (though float parameters are unusual):

float f2c(float f)
{
 return  (f - 32.0) * 5.0/9.0;
} 

float c2f(float c)
{
 return 9.0 * c/5.0 + 32.0;
}

Also as one of the other answers states, the condition (&ch == "-f") is never true.

Here is a complete working example, with error checking.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <assert.h>

static double f2c(double f)
{
 return (f - 32.0) * 5.0/9.0;
} 

static double c2f(double c)
{
 return 9.0 * c/5.0 + 32.0;
}

int main (int argc, char *argv[])
{
 int i;
 const char *label_f = "Fahrenheit";
 const char *label_c = "Celcius";
 const char *from, *to;
 double (*conversion)(double);

 from = label_c;
 to = label_f;
 conversion = c2f;

 for (i=1; i<argc; ++i)
   {
     if (0 == strcmp(argv[i], "-f"))
       {
         from = label_f;
         to = label_c;
         conversion = f2c;
       }
     else if (0 == strcmp(argv[i], "-c"))
       {
         from = label_c;
         to = label_f;
         conversion = c2f;
       }
     else
       {
         char *suffix = NULL;
         double temp_in;

         errno = 0;
         temp_in = strtod(argv[i], &suffix);

         if (ERANGE == errno)
           {
             if (HUGE_VAL == temp_in) 
               {
                 fprintf(stderr, "%s is too big", argv[i]);
                 return 1;
               }
             else
               {
                 assert(-HUGE_VAL == temp_in);
                 fprintf(stderr, "%s is too small", argv[i]);
                 return 1;
               }
           }
         else if (errno != 0 && (suffix == argv[i]))
           {
             /* no conversion was performed. */
             fprintf(stderr, "%s is not a number", argv[i]);
             return 1;
           }
         else if (*suffix) 
           {
             fprintf(stderr, "Expected a number but saw '%s'\n", argv[i]);
             return 1;
           }
         else
           {
             const double temp_out = (*conversion)(temp_in);
             printf("%f %s is %f %s.\n", temp_in, from, temp_out, to);
           }
       }
   }
 return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
thank you, this is much better way! –  Jack Morton Jul 5 '12 at 12:12
1  
Odd that this was voted down, but nobody bothered to explain why. –  James Youngman Jul 5 '12 at 19:31

You are comparing char with a C-string "-f". Use strcmp to compare C-strings.

You may also have declare ch as char array to more than one character which you need here. Because, you can't store "-f" in a single char as you do now.

With the changes:

#include<stdio.h>

float f2c(float f);
float c2f(float c);

int main(void)
{
 float cel;
 float celcius;
 float fahren;
 float fah;
 char ch[25];
 float number;

scanf("%s %f", ch, &number);

if(strcmp(ch,"-f")==0){
  f2c(number);
  celcius=f2c(number);
  printf("%f", celcius);
  }

 else{
  c2f(number);
  fahren = c2f(number);
  printf("%f", fahren);
  }

return 0;
}

float f2c(float f)
{
 float cel = (f - 32) * 5/9.0;
 return cel;
} 

float c2f(float c)
{
 float fah = (9 * c/5.0 + 32);
 return fah;
}

This is essentially your code, but modified it to read the input as C-string.

share|improve this answer
    
exactly, thank you!i'm just gonna use signle f instead –  Jack Morton Jul 5 '12 at 12:13

In addition to the other answers:

You are doing needless calls to the conversion functions and throwing away the results, just before doing the same calls again but with proper handling of the return value:

if(&ch == "-f"){
  f2c(number);  /* This line does absolutely nothing! */
  celcius=f2c(number);
  printf("%f", celcius);
  }
share|improve this answer

if(&ch == "-f") this is the problem. It should be :

if(ch == 'f')

share|improve this answer
    
thank you,exactly –  Jack Morton Jul 5 '12 at 12:12

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.