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I want to compare two collections in C# that I'm currently doing using nested "for" loop. is there a way in Linq to do the same which will be quicker and more efficient? here is my current code which works perfectly just looking for an efficient way:

OrgCollection myYears = Org.RetrieveDistinctYear();
if (myYears.Count > 0)
{
AcademicYearCollection allYears = AcademicYear.RetrieveAll();
for (int i = 0; i < myYears.Count; i++)
{
    for (int j = 0; j < allYears.Count; j++)
    {
        if (myYears[i].AcademicYearCode == allYears[j].Code)
        {
        ddlYear.Items.Insert(0, new ListItem(allYears[j].Name,allYears[j].Code));
        break;
        }
    }
}
}

I want to compare "Code" from AcademicYearCollection with the "AcademicYearCode" property in OrgCollection & if it is the same then add it in the Dropdownlist "ddlYear".

Thanks in advance.

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Sort them and compare in one loop. –  nhahtdh Jul 5 '12 at 12:43
    
Your code is more efficient. –  Nikhil Agrawal Jul 5 '12 at 12:44
    
try that link conclusion for future. Make some research before you post any question –  harry180 Jul 5 '12 at 12:48
    
how many items do you anticipate from RetrieveDistinctYear –  Jodrell Jul 5 '12 at 13:09
    
something that will increase over time and has a lot of data already in it. –  user569925 Jul 5 '12 at 13:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You can do it in LINQ, which gives shorter code. To know if it is more efficient or not you would have to profile it. I think that linq's join operator uses some kind of hash buckets inernally which should give better performance, especially if the collections are large. Your current solution is O(N^2) which will quickly degrade if the number of options increases.

OrgCollection myYears = Org.RetrieveDistinctYear();
AcademicYearCollection allYears = AcademicYear.RetrieveAll();

var items = from y in myYears
            join ay in allYears
            on y.Code equals ay.AcademicYearCode
            select new { ay.Name, ay.Code }
share|improve this answer
1  
Anders in response to the deleted comment, you can actually use Intersect if you pass your own IEqualityComparer. But this is much nicer :) –  Filip Ekberg Jul 5 '12 at 12:49
    
except, you don't need the intersect, just the first match –  Jodrell Jul 5 '12 at 13:04
    
This expression will compute all matches but the question only asks for the first. Subsequent processing is wasted effort. –  Jodrell Jul 5 '12 at 13:14
    
@Jodrell: you're right, I didn't see the break in the original question, so this will indeed return a separate result, if there are multiple matches. If there only is one match however it will be the same, but non-O(N^2) (if I've understood linq's join correctly). –  Anders Abel Jul 5 '12 at 13:22
    
or no matches :-), Jon Skeet states here stackoverflow.com/questions/271615/… that Join generates a Lookup internally, therefore I concur that Join will benefit from hashing. –  Jodrell Jul 5 '12 at 13:49
OrgCollection myYears = Org.RetrieveDistinctYear();
if (myYears.Count > 0)
{
    AcademicYearCollection allYears = AcademicYear.RetrieveAll();
    for (int i = 0; i < myYears.Count; i++)
    {
         if (allYears[j].Any(allY => allY ==  myYears[i].AcademicYearCode ))
            {
                ddlYear.Items.Insert(0, new ListItem(allYears[j].Name, allYears[j].Code));
                break;
            }

    }
}

This could be an option but i think the extension method 'any' works the same way by doing an iteration.

share|improve this answer

How about this

var allYears = AcademicYear.RetrieveAll().ToDictionary(y => y.Code, y.Name);

ListItem match = null;
foreach(var year in Org.RetrieveDistinctYear())
{
    if (allYears.HasKey(year.AcademicYearCode)
    {
        match = new ListItem(
                       allYears[year.AcademicYearCode], 
                       year.AcademicYearCode);
        break;
    }
}

if (match != null)
{
    ddlYear.Items.Insert(0, match); 
}

Using a Dictionary here provides superior performance and the further down the Org.RetrieveDistinctYear results the match is, the more benefit there will be. If the results of RetrieveDistinctYear are often short or the match is at the top the overhead of creating the dictionary will make the code unesscessarily slow.


EDIT

Or this approach

var allYears = AcademicYear.RetrieveAll().ToDictionary(y => y.Code, y.Name);

var matchingCode = Org.RetrieveDistinctYear()
    .Select(y = y.AcademicYearCode)
    .FirstOrDefault(code => allYears.HasKey(code));

if (!string.IsEmptyOrWhitespace(matchingCode))
{
    ddlYear.Items.Insert(0, new ListItem(
                                 allYears[matchingCode], 
                                 matchingCode)); 
}
share|improve this answer

This solution has similar speed and efficiency to your original solution, but it can be parallelized by changing from y in myYears to from y in myYears.AsParallel() to possibly speed it up.

OrgCollection myYears = Org.RetrieveDistinctYear();
AcademicYearCollection allYears = AcademicYear.RetrieveAll();

var items = from y in myYears
            let match = allYears.FirstOrDefault( ay => y.AcademicYearCode == ay.Code)
            where match != null
            select new ListItem(match.Name, match.Code);
share|improve this answer

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