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So here's the situation:

I have a recursive, asynchronous AJAX call which is pulling data from the server. This recursive call happens only once when the user logs in. I have another page which requires AJAX calls in order to navigate (basically a lazy-loaded tree). While the first AJAX call is happening, these other calls are taking a while to go through, and since the first could make as many as 2,000 requests, this delay can sometimes be fairly long.

Basically what I would like to achieve is to "pause" the recursive call when the other call is made. Pseudo code:

function recursiveAjax(){    
    $.ajax( {
        async : true,
        url : 'someurl',
        dataType : 'json',
        beforeSend : function(xhr) {
            // do stuff
        },
        error : function(xhr, ajaxOptions, thrownError) {
            // handle errors
        },
        success : function(data) {
            //conditions
            recursiveAjax();
        }
    });
}

function navigationAjax(){    
    $.ajax( {
        async : true,
        url : 'someurl',
        dataType : 'json',
        beforeSend : function(xhr) {
            // pause recursiveAjax();
        },
        error : function(xhr, ajaxOptions, thrownError) {
            // handle errors
        },
        success : function(data) {
            //conditions
            // resume recursiveAjax();
        }
    });
}
share|improve this question
    
That's pretty insane. Try wrapping the recursive calls in timeout blocks, eg on success: setTimeout(function() { recursiveAjax(); }, 500); — that should leave space for the other calls and is a little bit less insane. –  Mahn Jul 5 '12 at 13:26
    
Take a look at jQuery deferreds –  elclanrs Jul 5 '12 at 13:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As you probably don't want the two requests at the same time, let the recursive method do one or the other. Set a flag when you want the navigation call, and let the recursive method do that request the next iteration:

var navigationCall = false;

function recursiveAjax(){
  if (navigationCall) {
    navigationCall = false;
    $.ajax( {
      async : true,
      url : 'someurl',
      dataType : 'json',
      error : function(xhr, ajaxOptions, thrownError) {
        // handle errors
      },
      success : function(data) {
        //conditions
        recursiveAjax();
      }
    });
  } else {
    $.ajax( {
      async : true,
      url : 'someurl',
      dataType : 'json',
      beforeSend : function(xhr) {
        // do stuff
      },
      error : function(xhr, ajaxOptions, thrownError) {
        // handle errors
      },
      success : function(data) {
        //conditions
        recursiveAjax();
      }
    });
  }
}

function navigationAjax(){
  navigationCall = true;
}

Note: You might want to add a window.TimeOut call to do the recursion to throttle the streams of requests to the server. There is no point in calling the server more often than the human eye can see the changes.

share|improve this answer
    
The recursive call is building a data tree in the background - the user will never see it. It would make my life a lot easier if that tree didn't need to exist, but it does, and it needs to be done every time. Thankfully this is all a temporary measure, but it still pains me to see my app performing so poorly. –  Squishy Jul 5 '12 at 13:54
    
And that works alright. Still a pretty hefty performance hit but it's about twice as fast as it was before, so at least there's that. Many thanks –  Squishy Jul 5 '12 at 14:05
    
Why not limiting the rate at which recursiveAjax(); fires? running it once every 500ms would probably make a huge difference in terms of performance. –  Mahn Jul 5 '12 at 18:52

Simplest way:

window.recurse = true;
function recursiveAjax(){    
    $.ajax( {
        async : true,
        url : 'someurl',
        dataType : 'json',
        beforeSend : function(xhr) {
            // do stuff
        },
        error : function(xhr, ajaxOptions, thrownError) {
            // handle errors
        },
        success : function(data) {
            //conditions
            if(window.recurse){
               recursiveAjax();
            }
        }
    });
}

function navigationAjax(){    
    window.recurse=false;
    $.ajax( {
        async : true,
        url : 'someurl',
        dataType : 'json',
        beforeSend : function(xhr) {
            // pause recursiveAjax();
        },
        error : function(xhr, ajaxOptions, thrownError) {
            // handle errors
        },
        success : function(data) {
            //conditions
            window.recurse=true;
            recursiveAjax();
        }
    });
}
share|improve this answer
    
Good answer but it's making no perceivable difference performance wise. The navigationAjax call is still delayed by a few seconds. –  Squishy Jul 5 '12 at 13:51
    
@Squishy: You won't see any performance difference, the only difference is that you are keeping the client code from making another recursive request instead of letting the server queue that requests. However, you are still doing the navigation request while waiting for the response for the recursive requests, so the navigation request will still be queued by the server. –  Guffa Jul 5 '12 at 14:02

JavaScript is an asynchronous language and therefore you can do thinks like you wan't only with callbacks like in the other comment (see above). But think about your problem, most of the time it's better to work asynchronous in the web. Do you really wan't this?

share|improve this answer
    
No, I don't - but my boss does. Like I mentioned, its a temporary measure, so at least this code won't be out in the wild for long. –  Squishy Jul 5 '12 at 14:07

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