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I have the following pattern:

private void MyFunction()
{
    doStuff();

    if (problem())
    {
        cleanup();
        return;
    }

    doMoreStuff();

    if (otherProblem())
    {
        cleanup();
        return;
    }

    doYetMoreStuff();
}

The error cleanup code is duplicated. The obvious way to eliminate this is:

private void MyFunction()
{
    try {
        doStuff();

        if (problem()) throw new MyException();

        doMoreStuff();

        if (otherProblem()) throw new MyException();

        doYetMoreStuff();
    }
    catch (MyException)
    {
        cleanup();
        return;
    }
}

However, the error cases are not really exceptional - this is an ASP.Net page, and bad or no data in the query string will trigger the error cases. Exceptions seem to be the most obvious way to deduplicate the error handling and separate it from the main code, but as I understand it the accepted best practice is not to use exceptions for control flow like this.

What is the customary way of doing this?

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Well the code isn't being duplicated in the first instance if you use that cleanup() method? As you said, exceptions should only be used for exceptional cases. –  davenewza Jul 5 '12 at 13:38
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5 Answers 5

Using exceptions for non-exceptional situations is not a great idea, especially when the exception is thrown and caught in the same method. A better approach would be to use a boolean variable that indicates a need for cleanup, and performing your cleanup inside a finally block.

var needsCleanup = true;
try {
    doStuff();

    if (problem()) return;

    doMoreStuff();

    if (otherProblem()) return;

    doYetMoreStuff();

    needsCleanup = false;
} finally {
    if (needsCleanup) {
        cleanup;
    }
}
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+1 And not to mention the performance hit. –  Steve Jul 5 '12 at 13:43
    
@Steve Thanks, performance hit is definitely a valid concern when using exceptions to pass control. –  dasblinkenlight Jul 5 '12 at 13:50
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You could use just try .. finally and early returns.

private void MyFunction()
{
  try
  {
    doStuff();

    if (problem())
    {
        return;
    }

    doMoreStuff();

    if (otherProblem())
    {
        return;
    }

    doYetMoreStuff();
  }
  finally
  {
    cleanup();
  }
}
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The finally block will be executed any time execution leaves the try block, even if the reason that it leaves the try block is because you call return. So, you could do something like this:

private void MyFunction()
{
    try
    {
        doStuff();
        if (problem()) return;

        doMoreStuff();
        if (otherProblem()) return;

        doYetMoreStuff();
    }
    finally
    {
        cleanup();
    }
}
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If cleanup() is really just a method call than it's not duplicated.

I wouldn't use exceptions in this case. You can easily google for articles describing in details why using exception in normal flow is a bad idea: mainly in impacts performance and can screw up performance counters ('# of exceptions thrown' will be meaningless).

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cleanup is about three lines. –  Thom Smith Jul 5 '12 at 13:38
1  
Doesn't matter - extract a method and be done with it - DRY. –  Jakub Konecki Jul 5 '12 at 13:39
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Exceptions should be thrown when something unexpected happens.

Consider that you want to add a user in your database, but if the username already exists, you just want a error saying so. Now, an error does not have to be an exception!

bool AddUser(string username)

Now the flow would look like this instead:

if(AddUser(username)) {}
else
{
    // Notify the user that it didn't work
}

If an exception was thrown here, it Should be because the software couldn't connect to the database, not because the username already existed.

throwing and catching exceptions for flow control like this will cause more overhead than needed and thus you should use if/else to control this instead.

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