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I have a file (abc.txt) which contains values such as :

ENSP00000200691_1 70.00 1.64119
ENSP00000200691_3 100.00 1.55602
ENSP00000201943_1 93.00 1.14492
ENSP00000201943_2 64.00 1.2178
ENSP00000201943_3 75.00 1.43107
ENSP00000203407_2 90.00 2.04312
ENSP00000203407_4 71.00 1.8197

I want to create a hash where values such as ENSP00000200691 will be the key (_1,_2.. are different examples of the same case). Now the comparison to make is :

When the second coloumn values is lower than its corresponding examples of the same case, and yet the third coloumn value is higher of the corresponding - it should print the lines.

For example.. the first two lines are of such a case where the second coloumn value 70<100 while yet 1.64119 > 1.55602 (this should be printed)

Rest of the other two cases are of where $2(example1) > $2 (example2) and also $3(example1) > $3 (example2).

There can be around 10 examples of the same hash(case)

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closed as too broad by Jack Maney, ArjunShankar, Brad Gilbert, Flimzy, Tanis.7x Mar 3 at 2:25

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
10 examples meaning .. ENSPXXXXX_[1-10] –  user1504209 Jul 5 '12 at 14:04
6  
what have you tried? –  tuxuday Jul 5 '12 at 14:06
    
In line 2 of your data the second column value is higher than the first line, so from your rule that should not be printed (it has to be lower and the third column has to be higher). –  asjo Jul 5 '12 at 18:08
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1 Answer

Here is a guess at how to solve your (homework?) problem:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my %info;

while (my $line=<DATA>) {
    chomp $line;
    my ($protein_id, $length, $value)=split /\s+/, $line;
    $protein_id=~s/_\d+$//;

    if (exists $info{$protein_id}) {
        if ($length<$info{$protein_id}->{length} &&
            $value>$info{$protein_id}->{value}) {
            print "$line\n";
        }
    }
    else {
        $info{$protein_id}={ length=>$length, value=>$value };
    }
}

__DATA__
ENSP00000200691_1 70.00 1.64119
ENSP00000200691_3 100.00 1.55602
ENSP00000201943_1 93.00 1.14492
ENSP00000201943_2 64.00 1.2178
ENSP00000201943_3 75.00 1.43107
ENSP00000203407_2 90.00 2.04312
ENSP00000203407_4 71.00 1.8197

The output when run is this:

ENSP00000201943_2 64.00 1.2178
ENSP00000201943_3 75.00 1.43107

You didn't quite specify whether subsequent lines should always be compared to the first protein id, or if the last one seen, or the last one printed.

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Thanks. It needs to be compared to any example with the same protein id but yes, the examples of the same id will be always one after the other. So, if the last is not having the same id, it should have a fresh hash (which I think this script does?) –  user1504209 Jul 6 '12 at 19:06
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