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I am not good with regular expressions, and I could use some help with a couple of expressions I am working on. I have a line of text, such as Text here then 999-99 and I'd like to isolate that number sequence at the end. It could be either 999-99 or 999-99-9. The following seems to work:

\d{3}-\d{2}(-\d{1})?

But I notice that it really just seems to be searching anywhere within the text, as I can add text after the number sequence and it still matches. This needs to be more strict, so that the line must end with this exact sequence, and nothing after it. I tried ending with $ instead of ?, but that never seems to create a match (it always returns false).

I could also use some help with character replacement. I am working on a program which deals with OCR scanning, and occasionally the string value that comes back contains undisplayable characters, represented by the ܀ symbol. Is there a regular expression which will replace the ܀ characters with a space?

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with \d{3}-\d{2}(-\d{1})$ this should work –  DonCallisto Jul 5 '12 at 14:36
    
Preferably you should ask a separate question for the replacement portion of your question, and indicate which language you're using. –  Ahmad Mageed Jul 5 '12 at 14:42
    
I should clarify. When using $ instead of ?, it works when I use the test sequence 999-99-9, but does not work for 999-99. I need it to work for both, which I thought it would by using parentheses. –  tjc59 Jul 5 '12 at 14:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try this regular expression.

([\d-]+)$
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This should work. Just end your regex with $. It represents end of line

\d{3}-\d{2}(-\d{1})?$

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He specifically said that using $ didn't work for him. –  vergenzt Jul 5 '12 at 14:41
    
I should clarify. When using $ instead of ?, it works when I use the test sequence 999-99-9, but does not work for 999-99. I need it to work for both, which I thought it would by using parentheses. –  tjc59 Jul 5 '12 at 14:55

Use the word-boundary metacharacter, \b:

\b\d{3}-\d{2}(-\d)?\b

You can also remove the {1} from the last \d since it's redundant.

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This still returns a match if there is additional text after the number sequence. It must be strict, so that the string must end with this sequence, and nothing after it. –  tjc59 Jul 5 '12 at 14:57

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