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I've programmed a (very simple) benchmark in Java. It simply increments a double value up to a specified value and takes the time.

When I use this singlethreaded or with a low amount of threads (up to 100) on my 6-core desktop, the benchmark returns reasonable and repeatable results.

But when I use for example 1200 threads, the average multicore duration is significantly lower than the singlecore duration (about 10 times or more). I've made sure that the total amount of incrementations is the same, no matter how much threads I use.

Why does the performance drop so much with more threads? Is there a trick to solve this problem?

I'm posting my source, but I don't think, that there is a problem.

Benchmark.java:

package sibbo.benchmark;

import java.text.DecimalFormat;
import java.util.LinkedList;
import java.util.List;

public class Benchmark implements TestFinishedListener {
            private static final double TARGET = 1e10;
    private static final int THREAD_MULTIPLICATOR = 2;

    public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {
        Benchmark b = new Benchmark(TARGET);
        b.start();
    }

    private int coreCount;
    private List<Worker> workers = new LinkedList<>();
    private List<Worker> finishedWorkers = new LinkedList<>();
    private double target;

    public Benchmark(double target) {
        this.target = target;
        getSystemInfos();
        printInfos();
    }

    private void getSystemInfos() {
        coreCount = Runtime.getRuntime().availableProcessors();
    }

    private void printInfos() {
        System.out.println("Usable cores: " + coreCount);
        System.out.println("Multicore threads: " + coreCount *                 THREAD_MULTIPLICATOR);
        System.out.println("Loops per core: " + new DecimalFormat("###,###,###,###,##0").format(TARGET));

        System.out.println();
    }

    public synchronized void start() throws InterruptedException {
        Thread.currentThread().setPriority(Thread.MAX_PRIORITY);

        System.out.print("Initializing singlecore benchmark... ");
        Worker w = new Worker(this, 0);
        workers.add(w);

        Thread.sleep(1000);
        System.out.println("finished");

        System.out.print("Running singlecore benchmark... ");
        w.runBenchmark(target);
        wait();

        System.out.println("finished");
        printResult();

        System.out.println();
        // Multicore
        System.out.print("Initializing multicore benchmark...  ");
        finishedWorkers.clear();

        for (int i = 0; i < coreCount * THREAD_MULTIPLICATOR; i++) {
            workers.add(new Worker(this, i));
        }

        Thread.sleep(1000);
        System.out.println("finished");

        System.out.print("Running multicore benchmark...  ");

        for (Worker worker : workers) {
            worker.runBenchmark(target / THREAD_MULTIPLICATOR);
        }

        wait();

        System.out.println("finished");
        printResult();

        Thread.currentThread().setPriority(Thread.NORM_PRIORITY);
    }

    private void printResult() {
        DecimalFormat df = new DecimalFormat("###,###,###,##0.000");

        long min = -1, av = 0, max = -1;
        int threadCount = 0;
        boolean once = true;

        System.out.println("Result:");

        for (Worker w : finishedWorkers) {
            if (once) {
                once = false;

                min = w.getTime();
                max = w.getTime();
            }

            if (w.getTime() > max) {
                max = w.getTime();
            }

            if (w.getTime() < min) {
                min = w.getTime();
            }

            threadCount++;
            av += w.getTime();

            if (finishedWorkers.size() <= 6) {
                System.out.println("Worker " + w.getId() + ": " + df.format(w.getTime() / 1e9) + "s");
            }
        }

        System.out.println("Min: " + df.format(min / 1e9) + "s, Max: " + df.format(max / 1e9) + "s, Av per Thread: "
                + df.format((double) av / threadCount / 1e9) + "s");
    }

    @Override
    public synchronized void testFinished(Worker w) {
        workers.remove(w);
        finishedWorkers.add(w);

        if (workers.isEmpty()) {
            notify();
        }
    }
}

Worker.java:

package sibbo.benchmark;

public class Worker implements Runnable {
    private double value = 0;
    private long time;
    private double target;
    private TestFinishedListener l;
    private final int id;

    public Worker(TestFinishedListener l, int id) {
        this.l = l;
        this.id = id;

        new Thread(this).start();
    }

    public int getId() {
        return id;
    }

    public synchronized void runBenchmark(double target) {
        this.target = target;
        notify();
    }

    public long getTime() {
        return time;
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        synWait();
        value = 0;
        long startTime = System.nanoTime();

        while (value < target) {
            value++;
        }

        long endTime = System.nanoTime();
        time = endTime - startTime;

        l.testFinished(this);
    }

    private synchronized void synWait() {
        try {
            wait();
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
I'm assuming your asking for an explanation of why it is performing like this? –  Gray Jul 5 '12 at 14:56
    
Any chance you are running out of memory when you are running with 1200 threads? Can you watch your application with jconsole and see if the memory graphs show full eden and survivor spaces? You may need to increase memory available with -Xmx –  Gray Jul 5 '12 at 14:58
    
Yes that's what I'm interested in. –  Sibbo Jul 5 '12 at 14:58
    
I know that the javavm uses about 75MB memory when running this. I've never used jconsole, so I'll first set the maximum amount of memory to a higher value. –  Sibbo Jul 5 '12 at 15:00
    
The important thing to realise is that each thread will consume a fixed amount of stack space memory. IIRC, 512k (but configurable via -Xss). So a huge number of threads will consume a large amount of memory regardless of the work the threads are doing –  Brian Agnew Jul 5 '12 at 15:03

2 Answers 2

You need to understand that the OS (or Java thread scheduler, or both) is trying to balance between all of the threads in your application to give them all a chance to perform some work, and there is a non-zero cost to switch between threads. With 1200 threads, you have just reached (and probably far exceeded) the tipping point wherein the processor is spending more time context switching than doing actual work.

Here is a rough analogy:

You have one job to do in room A. You stand in room A for 8 hours a day, and do your job.

Then your boss comes by and tells you that you have to do a job in room B also. Now you need to periodically leave room A, walk down the hall to room B, and then walk back. That walking takes 1 minute per day. Now you spend 3 hours, 59.5 minutes working on each job, and one minute walking between rooms.

Now imagine that you have 1200 rooms to work in. You are going to spend more time walking between rooms than doing actual work. This is the situation that you have put your processor into. It is spending so much time switching between contexts that no real work gets done.

EDIT: Now, as per the comments below, maybe you spend a fixed amount of time in each room before moving on- your work will progress, but the number of context switches between rooms still affects the overall runtime of a single task.

share|improve this answer
    
Agreed - With enough threads, the box will spend more time jumping between them than it gets to spend actually running them. –  Robert Trickey Jul 5 '12 at 15:07
    
Doesn't explaing why singlecore version suffers less from the exceeding amount of threads –  TeaOverflow Jul 5 '12 at 15:29
1  
@Evgeni I assume the OP is misusing the term "single core" to mean "single threaded" here, based on his use of that term in the code. –  Chris Shain Jul 5 '12 at 15:36
1  
No, it won't, or at least, it shouldn't. Once the OS has more than twice as many ready threads as there are cores, the rate of context-switching cannot get any higher. it shouldn't matter whether there are 8 or 800 ready, CPU-intensive threads on a 4-core box - at every interrupt, 4 threads will be preempted and replaced with 4 others from the head of the ready queue for the priority set, shoving the oold threads at the tail. The only issue that may come up is, if the threads are not created with an appropriate stack size, there may be memory swapping issues with the thread stacks. –  Martin James Jul 5 '12 at 16:00
    
@ChrisShain Agreed, after reviewing his code more carefully. Sorry! –  TeaOverflow Jul 5 '12 at 16:06

Ok, I think I've found my problem, but until now, no solution.

When measuring the time every thread runs to do his part of the work, there are different possible minimums for different total amounts of threads. The maximum is the same everytime. In case that a thread is started first and then is paused very often and finishes last. For example this maximum value could be 10 seconds. Assuming that the total amount of operations that is done by every thread stays the same, no matter how much threads I use, the amount of operations that is done by a single thread has to be changed when using a different amount of threads. For example, using one thread, it has to do 1000 operations, but using ten threads, everyone of them has to do just 100 operations. Now, using ten threads, the minimum amount of time that one thread can use is much lower than using one thread. So calculating the average amount of time every thread needs to do his work is nonsense. The minimum using ten Threads would be 1 second. This happens if one thread does its work without interruption.

EDIT

The solution would be to simply measure the amount of time between the start of the first thread and the completion of the last.

share|improve this answer
    
The more threads per core you have the longer each thread takes to complete. Even the end to end time should increase once you have much mroe threads than cores. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 5 '12 at 15:42

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