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I want to define a virtual method that is not async in the base class but it is async in the derived class and the caller call it using a delegate (Actually it is an ICommand activated by a button on screen) how can I do this.

public class BaseClass
{
    BIONESSBindingCommand mLogoffCommand;

    public ICommand LogoffCommand
    {
        get
        {
            if (mLogoffCommand == null)
            {
                mLogoffCommand = new BIONESSBindingCommand(
                    Param => Logoff(), //Command DoWork
                    Param => true); //Always can execute
            }

            return mLogoffCommand;
        }
    }

    public virtual Task Logoff()
    {
        DoLogoff();
        return null; //???
    }
}

public class DerivedClass : BaseClass
{
    public override async Task Logoff()
    {
        await SomeWoAsyncWork();
        base.Logoff(); //Has warninngs
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Doesn't what you're doing just work (except for specifying properties and methods inside of a constructor)? – Filip Skakun Jul 5 '12 at 15:28

Call Task.FromResult to get a completed Task. Also, await it in the derived class (this will enable error propagation).

public class BaseClass
{
  public virtual Task Logoff()
  {
    DoLogoff();
    return Task.FromResult(false);
  }
}

public class DerivedClass : BaseClass
{
  public override async Task Logoff()
  {
    await SomeWoAsyncWork();
    await base.Logoff();
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The signature would need to be Task<bool> though, right? – Filip Skakun Jul 5 '12 at 15:57
    
No. Task<bool> derives from Task. – Stephen Cleary Jul 5 '12 at 16:05
    
Right, that works syntactically, but it's a bit like a method that returns Object. – Filip Skakun Jul 5 '12 at 16:54
    
Not at all. It's a method that returns a base type. With Task, no semantics are lost and there are no boxing issues. I agree that it would be cleaner to have a Task.FromResult() that returned just a plain Task (and I do provide one in my AsyncEx Library), but there isn't one provided by .NET. They decided that returning Task<T> is sufficient for this scenario. – Stephen Cleary Jul 5 '12 at 17:35
    
For anyone using the Microsoft Async package with .NET 4, a lot of these static methods are in TaskEx, not Task, including TaskEx.FromResult(...) – Michael Csikos Sep 12 '14 at 2:01

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